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Reinterpreting the Homeric Simile of Iliad 16.7–11: The Girl and Her Mother In Ancient Greek Warfare
Though long regarded as a scene of mother-daughter domesticity during peacetime, Iliad 16.7–11 reveals the destruction of normal life for a daughter and her mother on the verge of being captured byExpand
The Making of Fornication: Eros, Ethics, and Political Reform in Greek Philosophy and Early Christianity
The Making of Fornication: Eros, Ethics, and Political Reform in Greek Philosophy and Early Christianity, by Kathy L. Gaca. Hellenistic Culture and Society 40. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University ofExpand
Paul's Uncommon Declaration in Romans 1:18–32 and Its Problematic Legacy for Pagan and Christian Relations
By the late fourth century, prominent Christian leaders no longer remained content to advocate religious separatism from their polytheistic social environment. Instead they started making moreExpand
The Andrapodizing of War Captives in Greek Historical Memory
The fundamentals of "andrapodizing" in Greek historical memory need reexamining on lexical and moral grounds. Defining the term "sell into slavery" proves fallacious. "Enslave," though at coreExpand
Manhandled and ‘kicked around’: reinterpreting the etymology and symbolism of ảνδράποδα
As consensus has held since Lehrs, Brugmann, and Wackernagel, Greek-speaking warriors and traders called war-captives $ , etymologically ‘humanfooted’ (menschenflüssige), by analogy with forExpand
Martial Rape, Pulsating Fear, and the Sexual Maltreatment of Girls (παῖδες), Virgins (παρθένοι), and Women (γυναῖκες) in Antiquity
The variably sequenced tripartite noun phrase, παῖδες, παρθένοι, and γυναῖκες, is shown to be a coordinated noun series signifying “girls, virgins, and women,” not, as hitherto interpreted, παῖδες asExpand
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