• Publications
  • Influence
Europe's Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses: Self-Selection and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration
During the age of mass migration (1850-1913), one of the largest migration episodes in history, the United States maintained a nearly open border, allowing the study of migrant decisions unhinderedExpand
  • 356
  • 76
  • PDF
A Nation of Immigrants: Assimilation and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration
During the Age of Mass Migration (1850–1913), the United States maintained an open border, absorbing 30 million European immigrants. Prior cross-sectional work finds that immigrants initially heldExpand
  • 268
  • 42
  • PDF
Have the Poor Always Been Less Likely to Migrate? Evidence from Inheritance Practices During the Age of Mass Migration
Using novel data on 50,000 Norwegian men, we study the effect of wealth on the probability of internal or international migration during the Age of Mass Migration (1850-1913), a time when the USExpand
  • 123
  • 12
  • PDF
Cultural Assimilation During the Age of Mass Migration
Using two million census records, we document cultural assimilation during the Age of Mass Migration, a formative period in US history. Immigrants chose less foreign names for children as they spentExpand
  • 75
  • 7
  • PDF
To the New World and Back Again: Return Migrants in the Age of Mass Migration
The authors compile large data sets from Norwegian and US historical censuses to study return migration during the Age of Mass Migration (1850–1913). Norwegian immigrants who returned to Norway heldExpand
  • 18
  • 5
  • PDF
Automated Linking of Historical Data
TLDR
The recent digitization of complete count census data is an extraordinary opportunity for social scientists to create large longitudinal datasets by linking individuals from one census to another or from other sources to the census. Expand
  • 41
  • 3
  • PDF
Do Immigrants Assimilate More Slowly Today than in the Past?
Using millions of historical census records and modern birth certificates, we document that immigrants assimilated into US society at similar rates in the past and present. We measure culturalExpand
  • 19
  • 1
  • PDF
Revising Infant Mortality Rates for the Early Twentieth Century United States
Accurate vital statistics are required to understand the evolution of racial disparities in infant health and the causes of rapid secular decline in infant mortality during the early twentiethExpand
  • 4