• Publications
  • Influence
TOS9 Regulates White-Opaque Switching in Candidaalbicans
TLDR
A model was developed for the regulation of spontaneous switching between the opaque state and the white state that includes stochastic changes of Tos9p levels above and below a threshold that induce changes in the chromatin state of an as-yet-unidentified switching locus.
EFG1 Null Mutants of Candida albicansSwitch but Cannot Express the Complete Phenotype of White-Phase Budding Cells
TLDR
Results demonstrate that EFG1 expression is not essential for the switch event per se, but is essential for a subset of phenotypic characteristics necessary for the full expression of the phenotype of white-phase cells.
N-Acetylglucosamine Induces White to Opaque Switching, a Mating Prerequisite in Candida albicans
TLDR
It is demonstrated that a second signal, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), a monosaccharide produced primarily by gastrointestinal tract bacteria, also serves as a potent inducer of white to opaque switching and functions primarily through the Ras1/cAMP pathway and phosphorylated Wor1, the gene product of the master switch locus.
α-Pheromone-Induced “Shmooing” and Gene Regulation Require White-Opaque Switching during Candida albicans Mating
TLDR
It is demonstrated that α-pheromone causes shmooing, the initial step in the mating process, only in a/a cells expressing the opaque phenotype and only at temperatures below that in the human host.
Misexpression of the Opaque-Phase-Specific GenePEP1 (SAP1) in the White Phase of Candida albicans Confers Increased Virulence in a Mouse Model of Cutaneous Infection
TLDR
A misexpression strategy has been used to investigate the role of the opaque-phase-specific gene PEP1 (SAP1), which encodes a secreted aspartyl proteinase, in the expression of the unique opaque- Phase-specific virulence in two animal models.
Cell Biology of Mating in Candida albicans
TLDR
This study provides the first description of the cell biology of the mating process of C. albicans, suggesting that mating takes place in the absence of karyogamy between naturally occurring, homozygous a and α strains.
The two-component hybrid kinase regulator CaNIK1 of Candida albicans.
TLDR
Partial deletion of both CaNIK1 alleles did not inhibit either high-frequency phenotypic switching or the bud-hypha transition in high salt concentrations, but in both cases the efficiency of the developmental process was reduced.
Alternative Mating Type Configurations (a/α versus a/a or α/α) of Candida albicans Result in Alternative Biofilms Regulated by Different Pathways
TLDR
Observations suggest the hypothesis that while the upstream portion of the newly evolved pathway regulating a/a and α/α cell biofilms was derived intact from the upstream part of the conserved pheromone-regulated pathway for mating, the downstream portion was derived through modification of the downstream portions of the Conserved pathway for a/α biofilm formation.
Opaque cells signal white cells to form biofilms in Candida albicans
TLDR
It is demonstrated that pheromone induces cohesiveness between white cells, minority opaque cells increase two‐fold the thickness of majority white cell biofilms, and majoritywhite cell biofilmms facilitate minority opaque cell chemotropism.
The Histone Deacetylase Genes HDA1 andRPD3 Play Distinct Roles in Regulation of High-Frequency Phenotypic Switching in Candida albicans
TLDR
The two deacetylase genes HDA1 and RPD3 play distinct roles in the suppression of switching, that the two play distinct and selective role in the regulation of phase-specific genes, and that the deacetyases are in turn regulated by switching.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...