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MORPHOLOGY AND EVOLUTION OF THE RHYNCHOTAN HEAD (INSECTA: HEMIPTERA, HOMOPTERA)
The structure of the sclerous parts of representative Rhynchota is analyzed and compared with those of Psocoptera and Thysanoptera. Known data on embryology and musculature are also considered inExpand
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Insects from the Santana Formation, Lower Cretaceous, of Brazil. Bulletin of the AMNH ; no. 195
Ninety-seven specimens of Homoptera (AMNH 43328, 43600-4, 43607-33, 43635-6, 43638-68, 43670-90, 43692-6, 43711-3, 43760-1, 44105) from the Santana Formation, Lower Cretaceous of Brazil are known.Expand
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Five genera of new-world shovel-headed and spoon-bill leafhoppers (Hemiptera : Cicadellidae : Dorycephalini and Hecalini)
Les cicadelles du Nouveau Monde qui possedent une tete tres aplatie sont classifiees ici en trois tribus, les Deltocephalini (six genres), les Dorycephalini (deux genres) et les Hecalini (septExpand
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INTRODUCED AND NATIVE LEAFHOPPERS COMMON TO THE OLD AND NEW WORLDS (RHYNCHOTA: HOMOPTERA: CICADELLIDAE)
Fourteen new records of introduced leafhoppers are added to the 157 leafhoppers previously recorded as occurring in both the Old and New worlds. Of these, 62 were erroneously recorded previouslyExpand
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A new family of froghoppers from the American tropics (Hemiptera: Cercopoidea: Epipygidae)
ABSTRACT Froghoppers (Cercopoidea) are divided into three families: spittlebugs or Cercopidae, which are efficient spittle-producers; Clastopteridae (including subfamily Machaerotinae, new status),Expand
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Revision of the Macropsini and Neopsini of the New-World (Rhynchota: Homoptera: Cicadellidae), with notes on intersex morphology
The Neopsini encompasses two genera, both exclusively Neotropical: Neopsis Oman (5 species) and Nollia n. gen. (2 species). Neopsis amazonica n. sp., Neopsis tumidifrons n. sp., Neopsis magna n. sp.Expand
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Bugs Reveal an Extensive, Long-lost Northern Tallgrass Prairie
Abstract Only tiny remnants of unploughed natural meadows remain in the eastern part of the state of North Dakota, and in Canada from eastern Saskatchewan to Manitoba. Those west of Lake Manitoba andExpand
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