Learn More
The present study tested the hypothesis that separate neural substrates mediate cocaine relapse elicited by drug-associated contextual stimuli vs explicit conditioned stimuli (CSs) and cocaine. Specifically, we investigated the involvement of the dorsal hippocampus (DH), basolateral amygdala (BLA), and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) in contextual(More)
Orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) damage elicits impulsivity and perseveration, and impairments in OFC function may underlie compulsive drug seeking in cocaine users. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of fiber-sparing lesions or functional inactivation of OFC subregions on cocaine seeking in rats. Rats were trained to lever press for intravenous(More)
RATIONALE The nucleus accumbens (NAC) is theorized to be a critical element of the neural circuitry that mediates relapse to cocaine seeking. Evidence suggests that the NAC is a functionally heterogeneous structure, and the core (NACc) and shell (NACs) regions of the NAC may play a differential role in stimulus-induced motivated behavior. Thus,(More)
RATIONALE Sex differences have been reported in physiological and behavioral responses to cocaine, but it is unclear whether sex differences exist in conditioned-cued relapse to cocaine seeking after prolonged abstinence. Furthermore, the role of estrous cyclicity in conditioned-cued relapse has not been investigated. OBJECTIVE We assessed the influence(More)
INTRODUCTION Sepsis may be associated with disturbances in cerebral oxygen transport and cerebral haemodynamic function, thus rendering the brain particularly susceptible to hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxia on dynamic cerebral autoregulation in a human-experimental model of the systemic(More)
Background and Purpose—Dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired in subjects who develop acute mountain sickness (AMS), a neurological disorder characterized by headache. The present study examined if the normoxic sea-level measurement of dynamic cerebral autoregulation would predict subsequent susceptibility to AMS during rapid ascent to terrestrial high(More)
  • 1