Jutta Reinhard-Rupp

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The occurrence of schistosomiasis within African infants and preschool children has been much better documented in recent years, revealing an important burden of disease previously overlooked. Despite mounting evidence showing that treatment with praziquantel is safe, beneficial, and could be delivered within ongoing public health interventions, young(More)
In recent years, control of neglected tropical diseases has been increasingly gaining momentum and interventions against schistosomiasis are being progressively scaled-up through expansion of donated praziquantel and preventive chemotherapy campaigns. However, the public health importance of female genital schistosomiasis is not fully recognised nor its(More)
The shortage of functional information compared to the abundance of sequence information characterizes today’s situation in functional genomics. For many years the knock-down of a gene’s product has been the most powerful way of analysing its function. In addition to the complete knock-out by homologous recombination, several different techniques have been(More)
Early in the history of schistosomiasis research, children under 5 years of age were known to be infected. Although this problem was recognized over 100 years ago, insufficient action has been taken to address this issue. Under current policy, such infected children only receive their first antiparasitic treatment (praziquantel - PZQ) upon entry into(More)
Development of new drugs and vaccines for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is unattractive from a market perspective due to the lack of sufficient financial incentives and low return on investment. To address the health burden of NTDs in lowand middle-income countries, research and development (R&D) programs for this group of diseases are increasingly(More)
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by blood flukes. The disease is caused by an inflammatory reaction to parasite eggs retained in the liver, bladder and reproductive organs. According to 2017 World Health Organization (WHO) estimates 220 million people are potentially infected, from which probably 10% are children under 6 years of age. The(More)
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