Justin Filiberto

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6234. Justin Filiberto, Emily Chin, James M.D. Day, Juliane Gross, Sarah C. Penniston-Dorland, Susanne P. Schwenzer, and Allan H. Treiman.Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Department of Geology, 1259 Lincoln Road, Mailcode 4324, Carbondale, Il 62901, 618-453-4849, email: filiberto@siu.edu. 2 Rice University, Department of Earth Science, 6100 Main(More)
The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit investigated the igneous and alteration mineralogy and chemistry of Home Plate and its surrounding deposits. Here, we focus on using thermochemical modeling to understand the secondary alteration mineralogy at the Home Plate outcrop and surrounding Columbia Hills region in Gusev crater. At high temperatures (300 °C),(More)
Edwards, R. Anderson, M. D. Dyar, M. Fisk, L. Thompson, P. Gasda, S. P. Schwenzer, W. Goetz, D. Blaney, J. Filiberto, R. C. Wiens, Space Research Centre, University of Leicester UK j.bridges@le.ac.uk USGS Astrogeology Science Center, Flagstaff, AZ, Mt. Holyoke College, Ma, Oregon State Univ., Planetary and Space Science Centre, University of New Brunswick,(More)
The Windjana drill sample, a sandstone of the Dillinger member (Kimberley formation, Gale Crater, Mars), was analyzed by CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the MSL Curiosity rover. From Rietveld refinements of its XRD pattern, Windjana contains the following: sanidine (21% weight, ~Or95); augite (20%); magnetite (12%); pigeonite; olivine; plagioclase;(More)
The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit investigated the igneous and alteration mineralogy and chemistry of Home Plate and its surrounding deposits. Here, we focus on using thermochemical modeling to understand the secondary alteration mineralogy at the Home Plate outcrop and surrounding Columbia Hills region in Gusev crater. At high temperatures (300 °C),(More)
Introduction: Basaltic pyroclastic rocks are uncommon on Earth because most mafic magmas are too volatile-poor to drive explosive eruptions [3-4]. However, basaltic pyroclastic deposits maybe much more common on Mars than on Earth [4-7] because Mars’ lower gravity and thinner atmosphere permit explosive eruptions from magmas with lower volatile contents.(More)
Introduction: Knowledge of martian igneous and mantle composition is crucial for understanding mantle evolution including early differentiation, mantle convection and the chemical alteration of the surface. Primitive magmas provide critical information on their mantle source regions but most Martian meteorites crystallized from fractionated melts [1]. The(More)
Previous estimates of the volatile contents of Martian basalts, and hence their source regions, ranged from nearly volatile-free through estimates similar to those found in terrestrial subduction zones. Here, we use the bulk chemistry of Martian meteorites, along with Martian apatite and amphibole chemistry, to constrain the volatile contents of the Martian(More)