Jussi Tuomas Eronen

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Fossil teeth of terrestrial plant-eating mammals offer a new, quasi-quantitative proxy for environmental aridity that resolves previously unseen regional features across the Eurasian continent from 24 to 2 million years ago. The pattern seen prior to 11 million years ago are quite different from today’s. Thereafter, a progressively modern rainfall(More)
Background: We developed a method to estimate precipitation using mammalian ecomorphology, specifically the relative height of the molars of herbivores (see companion paper, this issue). Question: If we apply the new method to paleoenvironments, do the results agree with previous results from fossil mammals and paleobotanical proxies? Data: Large(More)
Question: How can mammalian community characteristics be used to estimate regional precipitation? Data: Global distribution data of large mammals and their ecomorphology; global climate data. Research methods: Non-linear regression-tree analysis and linear regression. Conclusions: The methods unravelled the complex relationships between the environment and(More)
The Late Miocene development of faunas and environments in western Eurasia is well known, but the climatic and environmental processes that controlled its details are incompletely understood. Here we map the rise and fall of the classic Pikermian fossil mammal chronofauna between 12 and 4.2 Ma, using genus-level faunal similarity between localities. To(More)
We present here a study of European Neogene primate occurrences in the context of changing humidity. We studied the differences of primate localities versus non-primate localities by using the mammal communities and the ecomorphological data of the taxa present in the communities. The distribution of primates is influenced by humidity changes during the(More)
Zoogeography, the subdivision of geographical space into regional subunits based on their fauna, has been a core activity of biology at least since the time of Wallace (1876). Originally its emphasis was on entire faunas and geographical units at the subcontinental or regional level (see the comprehensive review in Udvardy, 1969), but progress in the(More)
We outline here an approach for understanding the biology of climate change, one that integrates data at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Taxon-free trait analysis, or "ecometrics," is based on the idea that the distribution in a community of ecomorphological traits such as tooth structure, limb proportions, body mass, leaf shape, incubation(More)
Questions: What was the distribution of fossil mammal taxa in the Miocene German Molasse Basin? Were there changes in community structure during the terrestrial development of the Molasse Basin? Were community dynamics similar in the Molasse Basin to those in the rest of Europe? Data: We gathered the available Miocene large mammal herbivore occurrences from(More)
J BRET BENNINGTON,1* WILLIAM A. DIMICHELE,2 CATHERINE BADGLEY,3 RICHARD K. BAMBACH,2 PAUL M. BARRETT,4 ANNA K. BEHRENSMEYER,2 RENÉ BOBE,5 ROBYN J. BURNHAM,3 EDWARD B. DAESCHLER,6 JAN VAN DAM,7 JUSSI T. ERONEN,8 DOUGLAS H. ERWIN,2 SETH FINNEGAN,9 STEVEN M. HOLLAND,5 GENE HUNT,2 DAVID JABLONSKI,10 STEPHEN T. JACKSON,11 BONNIE F. JACOBS,12 SUSAN M. KIDWELL,10(More)
We have recently shown that rainfall, one of the main climatic determinants of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP), can be robustly estimated from mean molar tooth crown height (hypsodonty) of mammalian herbivores. Here, we show that another functional trait of herbivore molar surfaces, longitudinal loph count, can be similarly used to extract(More)