Julianne L. Baron

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Drinking water distribution systems, including premise plumbing, contain a diverse microbiological community that may include opportunistic pathogens. On-site supplemental disinfection systems have been proposed as a control method for opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing. The majority of on-site disinfection systems to date have been installed in(More)
BACKGROUND Opportunistic waterborne pathogens (eg, Legionella, Pseudomonas) may persist in water distribution systems despite municipal chlorination and secondary disinfection and can cause health care-acquired infections. Point-of-use (POU) filtration can limit exposure to pathogens; however, their short maximum lifetime and membrane clogging have limited(More)
This investigation compared biological quantification of potable and non-potable (cooling) water samples using pour plate heterotrophic plate count (HPC) methods and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration measurement using bioluminescence. The relationship between these measurements and the presence of Legionella spp. was also examined. HPC for potable(More)
Currently, our knowledge of fungal ecology in engineered drinking water systems is limited, despite the potential for these systems to serve as a reservoir for opportunistic pathogens. In this study, hot water samples were collected both prior to and following the addition of monochloramine as an on-site disinfectant in a hospital hot water system. Fungal(More)
Opportunistic pathogens, including Legionella spp. and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, can thrive in building hot water systems despite municipal and traditional on-site chlorine disinfection. Monochloramine is a relatively new approach to on-site disinfection, but the microbiological impact of on-site chloramine use has not been well studied. We hypothesized(More)
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy of a new monochloramine generation system for control of Legionella in a hospital hot water distribution system. SETTING A 495-bed tertiary care hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The hospital has 12 floors covering approximately 78,000 m(2). METHODS The hospital hot water system was monitored for a total of 29(More)
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) can be successfully treated with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec); however, complete remissions are rare and patients frequently achieve disease stabilization in the presence of residual tumor masses. The clinical observation that discontinuation of treatment can lead to tumor progression suggests that residual tumor cells(More)
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) can be successfully treated with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec); however, complete remissions are rare and patients frequently achieve disease stabilization in the presence of residual tumor masses. The clinical observation that discontinuation of treatment can lead to tumor progression suggests that residual tumor cells(More)
Legionnaires’ disease is commonly diagnosed clinically using a urinary antigen test. The urinary antigen test is highly accurate for L. pneumophila serogroup 1, however other diagnostic tests should also be utilized in conjunction with the urinary antigen as many other Legionella species and serogroups are pathogenic. Culturing of patient specimens remains(More)
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