Julia Fröbel

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A number of secreted precursor proteins of bacteria, archaea, and plant chloroplasts stand out by a conserved twin arginine-containing sequence motif in their signal peptides. Many of these precursor proteins are secreted in a completely folded conformation by specific twin arginine translocation (Tat) machineries. Tat machineries are high molecular mass(More)
The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway guides fully folded proteins across membranes of bacteria, archaea and plant chloroplasts. In Escherichia coli, Tat-specific transport is executed in a still largely unknown manner by three functionally diverse membrane proteins, termed TatA, TatB, and TatC. In order to follow the intracellular distribution of(More)
The so-called Tat (twin-arginine translocation) system transports completely folded proteins across cellular membranes of archaea, prokaryotes and plant chloroplasts. Tat-directed proteins are distinguished by a conserved twin-arginine (RR-) motif in their signal sequences. Many Tat systems are based on the membrane proteins TatA, TatB and TatC, of which(More)
Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) denotes a protein transport pathway in bacteria, archaea and plant chloroplasts, which is specific for precursor proteins harbouring a characteristic twin-arginine pair in their signal sequences. Many Tat substrates receive cofactors and fold prior to translocation. For a subset of them, proofreading chaperones coordinate(More)
The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway of bacteria and plant chloroplasts mediates the transmembrane transport of folded proteins, which harbour signal sequences with a conserved twin-arginine motif. Many Tat translocases comprise the three membrane proteins TatA, TatB and TatC. TatC was previously shown to be involved in recognizing twin-arginine(More)
Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) is a unique protein transport pathway in bacteria, archaea, and plastids. It mediates the transmembrane transport of fully folded proteins, which harbor a consensus twin-arginine motif in their signal sequences. In Gram-negative bacteria and plant chloroplasts, three membrane proteins, named TatA, TatB, and TatC, are(More)
The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Tat signal peptides contain a consensus motif (S/T-R-R-X-F-L-K) that is thought to play a crucial role in substrate recognition by the Tat translocase. Replacement of the phenylalanine at the +2 consensus position in the signal peptide of a(More)
Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) systems mediate the transmembrane translocation of completely folded proteins that possess a conserved twin-arginine (RR) motif in their signal sequences. Many Tat systems consist of three essential membrane components named TatA, TatB, and TatC. It is not understood why some bacteria, in addition, constitutively express a(More)
The parathyroid hormone (PTH)1 receptor is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and regulates bone and mineral metabolism of vertebrates. A truncated highly active parathyroid hormone fragment PTH (1-34) exerts stimulatory effects on the receptor and is used for treatment of osteoporosis. To study the interacting amino acids of(More)
The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports folded proteins across bacterial membranes. Tat precursor proteins possess a conserved twin-arginine (RR) motif in their signal peptides that is involved in their binding to the Tat translocase, but some facets of this interaction remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of the hydrophobic (h-)(More)