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Improving diet and lifestyle is a critical component of the American Heart Association's strategy for cardiovascular disease risk reduction in the general population. This document presents recommendations designed to meet this objective. Specific goals are to consume an overall healthy diet; aim for a healthy body weight; aim for recommended levels of(More)
T his document presents guidelines for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease by dietary and other lifestyle practices. Since the previous publication of these guidelines by the American Heart Association, 1 the overall approach has been modified to emphasize their relation to specific goals that the AHA considers of greatest importance for lowering(More)
M edical nutrition therapy (MNT) is important in preventing diabetes, managing existing diabetes, and preventing, or at least slowing, the rate of development of diabetes complications. It is, therefore, important at all levels of diabetes prevention (see Table 1). MNT is also an integral component of diabetes self-management education (or training). This(More)
High intakes of dietary sugars in the setting of a worldwide pandemic of obesity and cardiovascular disease have heightened concerns about the adverse effects of excessive consumption of sugars. In 2001 to 2004, the usual intake of added sugars for Americans was 22.2 teaspoons per day (355 calories per day). Between 1970 and 2005, average annual(More)
A 2009 American Heart Association scientific statement titled " Dietary Sugars Intake and Cardiovascular Health " (1) concluded that current intake of added sugars among Americans greatly exceeds discretionary calorie allowances based on the 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines (2). For this reason, the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee recommended(More)
A 2009 American Heart Association scientific statement titled " Dietary Sugars Intake and Cardiovascular Health " 1 concluded that current intake of added sugars among Americans greatly exceeds discretionary calorie allowances based on the 2005 US Dietary Guidelines. 2 For this reason, the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee recommended(More)
Weight-loss interventions generally improve lipid profiles and reduce cardiovascular disease risk, but effects are variable and may depend on genetic factors. We performed a genetic association analysis of data from 2,993 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program to test the hypotheses that a genetic risk score (GRS) based on deleterious alleles at 32(More)
T he effectiveness of medical nutrition therapy (MNT) in the management of diabetes has been well established (1). Previous reviews have provided comprehensive recommendations for MNT in the management of diabetes (2,3). The goals of MNT are to 1) attain and maintain optimal blood glucose levels, a lipid and lipoprotein profile that reduces the risk of(More)
T he purpose of this report is to review the effects of dietary sugar on health, with an emphasis on cardio-vascular disease (CVD) and its risk factors. Although there are no dietary trials linking sugar consumption and CVD, there are several reasons why sugar consumption should be limited. Definitions There are many, sometimes confusing, terms used in the(More)