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The evolution of self-control
TLDR
It is suggested that increases in absolute brain size provided the biological foundation for evolutionary increases in self-control, and implicate species differences in feeding ecology as a potential selective pressure favoring these skills.
Other-regarding preferences in a non-human primate: Common marmosets provision food altruistically
TLDR
It is demonstrated that common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) do spontaneously provide food to nonreciprocating and genetically unrelated individuals, indicating that other-regarding preferences are not unique to humans and that their evolution did not require advanced cognitive abilities such as theory of mind.
The evolutionary origin of human hyper-cooperation.
TLDR
Because the human data fit this general primate pattern, the adoption of cooperative breeding by the authors' hominin ancestors also provides the most parsimonious explanation for the origin of human hyper-cooperation.
On the psychology of cooperation in humans and other primates: combining the natural history and experimental evidence of prosociality
TLDR
The comparison suggests that humans share with their closest living relatives reactive responses to signals of need, but differ in sensitivity to signs of need and cues of being watched, as well as in the presence of proactive prosociality.
Overall Brain Size, and Not Encephalization Quotient, Best Predicts Cognitive Ability across Non-Human Primates
TLDR
This estimate of general cognitive ability across primates is not strongly correlated with neuroanatomical measures that statistically control for a possible effect of body size, such as encephalization quotient or brain size residuals, and there was no indication that neocortex-based measures were superior to measures based on the whole brain.
Cooperative breeding and human cognitive evolution
TLDR
It is proposed that these cognitive consequences of cooperative breeding could have become more pervasive in the human lineage because the psychological changes were added to an ape‐level cognitive system capable of understanding simple mental states, albeit mainly in competitive contexts.
Primate energy expenditure and life history
TLDR
Broad interspecific comparisons of growth, reproduction, and maximum life span indicate that primates’ slow metabolic rates contribute to their characteristically slow life histories.
Social learning and evolution: the cultural intelligence hypothesis
TLDR
The cultural intelligence hypothesis, which complements the traditional benefit hypotheses for the evolution of intelligence by specifying the conditions in which these benefits can be reaped, predicts that more heavily cultural species should be more intelligent.
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