Judith Ann Clements

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COSMIC is currently the most comprehensive global resource for information on somatic mutations in human cancer, combining curation of the scientific literature with tumor resequencing data from the Cancer Genome Project at the Sanger Institute, U.K. Almost 4800 genes and 250000 tumors have been examined, resulting in over 50000 mutations available for(More)
The discovery of mutations in cancer genes has advanced our understanding of cancer. These results are dispersed across the scientific literature and with the availability of the human genome sequence will continue to accrue. The COSMIC (Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer) database and website have been developed to store somatic mutation data in a(More)
Like a set of bookends, cellular, molecular, and genetic changes of the beginnings of life mirror those of one of the most common cause of death--metastatic cancer. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important change in cell phenotype which allows the escape of epithelial cells from the structural constraints imposed by tissue architecture,(More)
Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common PrCa susceptibility alleles, we previously conducted a genome-wide association study in which 541,129 SNPs were genotyped in 1,854 PrCa cases with clinically detected disease and in 1,894 controls. We have now extended the study to evaluate(More)
Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the international PRACTICAL Consortium. Twenty-three new prostate cancer(More)
The 15 members of the kallikrein-related serine peptidase (KLK) family have diverse tissue-specific expression profiles and putative proteolytic functions. The kallikrein family is also emerging as a rich source of disease biomarkers with KLK3, commonly known as prostate-specific antigen, being the current serum biomarker for prostate cancer. The kallikrein(More)
PURPOSE The wild-type or variant mRNAs of several kallikrein (KLK) genes, such as KLK4, are highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and may have potential as tumor markers. Two of these KLK genes (KLK5 and KLK7) and their proteins (hK5 and hK7) were first identified in the skin epidermis, where hK5 may be the physiological activator of hK7. The purpose of(More)
The tissue or glandular kallikreins (KLK) are members of a highly conserved multigene family encoding serine proteases that are central to many biological processes. The rodent KLK families are large, highly conserved and clustered at one locus. The human KLK gene family is clustered on chromosome 19q13.3-13.4, and until recently consisted of just three(More)
Prostate cancer metastasis is reliant on the reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the bone niche/micro-environment. The production of suitable matrices to study metastasis, carcinogenesis and in particular prostate cancer/bone micro-environment interaction has been limited to specific protein matrices or matrix secreted by immortalised cell(More)
The tissue kallikreins are serine proteases encoded by highly conserved multi-gene families. The rodent kallikrein (KLK) families are particularly large, consisting of 13-26 genes clustered in one chromosomal locus. It has been recently recognised that the human KLK gene family is of a similar size (15 genes) with the identification of another 12 related(More)