Learn More
We examined peer-reviewed studies in order to understand the current status of empirically-based evidence on the clinical applications of robots in the diagnosis and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Studies are organized into four broad categories: (a) the response of individuals with ASD to robots or robot-like behavior in comparison to human(More)
In research, it has been difficult to characterize the prosodic production differences that have been observed clinically in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Moreover, the nature of these differences has been particularly hard to identify. This study examined one possible contributor to these perceived differences: motor planning. We examined the ability of(More)
This report describes the development of a prototypical Wizard of Oz, graphical user interface to wirelessly control a small, humanoid robot (Aldebaran Nao) during a therapy session for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The Dynamically Operated Manually Executed Robot interface (DOMER) enables an operator to initiate pre-developed behavior(More)
In this study, we employed an eye-gaze paradigm to explore whether children (ages 8-12) and adolescents (ages 12-18) with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are able to use prosodic cues to determine the syntactic structure of an utterance. Persons with ASD were compared to typically developing (TD) peers matched on age, IQ, gender, and receptive language(More)
In this article, we comment on specific aspects of Peppé (Peppé, 2009). In particular, we address the assessment and treatment of prosody in clinical settings and discuss current theory on neurological models of prosody. We argue that in order for prosodic assessment instruments and treatment programs to be clinical effective, we need assessment instruments(More)
This study examined the measurement tools and target symptoms/skills used to assess treatment response during Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) intervention trials from 2001 through 2010. Data from 195 prospective trials were analyzed. There were 289 unique measurement tools, of which 61.6 % were used only once, and 20.8 % were investigator-designed. Only(More)
In this study, we employed an eye-gaze paradigm to explore whether children (8-12) and adolescents (12-18) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are able to use prosodic cues to disambiguate syntactic structure of an utterance. Persons with ASD were compared to typically-developing peers matched on chronological age, IQ, gender, and receptive language(More)
This pilot study evaluated a novel intervention designed to reduce social anxiety and improve social/vocational skills for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The intervention utilized a shared interest in robotics among participants to facilitate natural social interaction between individuals with ASD and typically developing (TD) peers. Eight(More)
  • 1