Joshua C. Mandel

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OBJECTIVE The Substitutable Medical Applications, Reusable Technologies (SMART) Platforms project seeks to develop a health information technology platform with substitutable applications (apps) constructed around core services. The authors believe this is a promising approach to driving down healthcare costs, supporting standards evolution, accommodating(More)
OBJECTIVE In early 2010, Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital began an interoperability project with the distinctive goal of developing a platform to enable medical applications to be written once and run unmodified across different healthcare IT systems. The project was called Substitutable Medical Applications and Reusable Technologies(More)
▸ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ amiajnl-2014-002864 ▸ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ amiajnl-2014-002747 ▸ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ amiajnl-2014-002758 ▸ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ amiajnl-2014-002764 ▸ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ amiajnl-2014-002744 ▸ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ amiajnl-2014-002746 ▸ http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ amiajnl-2014-002743 ▸(More)
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Upgrades to electronic health record (EHR) systems scheduled to be introduced in the USA in 2014 will advance document interoperability between care providers. Specifically, the second stage of the federal incentive program for EHR adoption, known as Meaningful Use, requires use of the Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture(More)
Healthcare data will soon be accessible using standard, open software interfaces. Here, we describe how these interfaces could lead to improved healthcare by facilitating the development of software applications (apps) that can be shared across physicians, health care organizations, translational researchers, and patients. We provide recommendations for(More)
The Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technologies (SMART) project provides a framework of core services to facilitate the use of substitutable health-related web applications. The platform offers a common interface used to "SMART-ready" health IT systems allowing any SMART application to be able to interact with those systems. At Partners Healthcare, we(More)
OBJECTIVE Recognizing a need for our EHR to be highly interoperable, our team at Duke Health enabled our Epic-based electronic health record to be compatible with the Boston Children's project called Substitutable Medical Apps and Reusable Technologies (SMART), which employed Health Level Seven International's (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability(More)
BACKGROUND Non-adherence to prescribed medications is a serious health problem in the United States, costing an estimated $100 billion per year. While poor adherence should be addressable with point of care health information technology, integrating new solutions with existing electronic health records (EHR) systems require customization within each(More)
We have developed an interface to serve patient data from Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) repositories in the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) format, referred to as a SMART-on-FHIR cell. The cell serves FHIR resources on a per-patient basis, and supports the "substitutable" modular third-party applications(More)
BACKGROUND Precision cancer medicine (PCM) will require ready access to genomic data within the clinical workflow and tools to assist clinical interpretation and enable decisions. Since most electronic health record (EHR) systems do not yet provide such functionality, we developed an EHR-agnostic, clinico-genomic mobile app to demonstrate several features(More)