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Programmed cell death (PCD), important in normal animal physiology and disease, can be divided into at least two morphological subtypes, including type I, or apoptosis, and type II, or autophagic cell death. While many molecules involved in apoptosis have been discovered and studied intensively during the past decade, autophagic cell death is not well(More)
Two mutagenic events are required to make null mutations of polyhomeotic (ph), which suggests that the locus is complex. Amorphic mutations (ph degrees) die in mid-embryogenesis and completely lack ventral thoracic and abdominal epidermal derivatives, whereas single-event mutations lead to transformations similar to those of known dominant gain of function(More)
BACKGROUND Programmed cell death is used to remove excess cells between ommatidia in the Drosophila pupal retina. This death is required to establish the crystalline, hexagonal packing of ommatidia that characterizes the adult fly eye. In previously described echinus mutants, interommatidial cell sorting, which precedes cell death, occurred relatively(More)
The repetitive ETn (early transposon) family of sequences represents an active "mobile mutagen" in the mouse genome. The presence of long terminal repeats (LTRs) and other diagnostic features indicate that ETns are retrotransposons but they contain no long open reading frames or documented similarity to the genes of known retroviruses or other(More)
The insect steroid hormone ecdysone triggers programmed cell death of obsolete larval tissues during metamorphosis and provides a model system for understanding steroid hormone control of cell death and cell survival. Previous genome-wide expression studies of Drosophila larval salivary glands resulted in the identification of many genes associated with(More)
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