Josephine Borghi

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BACKGROUND Neonatal deaths in developing countries make the largest contribution to global mortality in children younger than 5 years. 90% of deliveries in the poorest quintile of households happen at home. We postulated that a community-based participatory intervention could significantly reduce neonatal mortality rates. METHODS We pair-matched 42(More)
BACKGROUND Community mobilisation through participatory women's groups might improve birth outcomes in poor rural communities. We therefore assessed this approach in a largely tribal and rural population in three districts in eastern India. METHODS From 36 clusters in Jharkhand and Orissa, with an estimated population of 228 186, we assigned 18 clusters(More)
BACKGROUND Few studies have assessed whether the poorest people in developing countries benefit from giving birth at home rather than in a facility. We analysed whether socioeconomic status results in differences in the use of professional midwives at home and in a basic obstetric facility in a rural area of Bangladesh, where obstetric care was free of(More)
Coverage of cost-effective maternal health services remains poor due to insufficient supply and inadequate demand for these services among the poorest groups. Households pay too great a share of the costs of maternal health services, or do not seek care because they cannot afford the costs. Available evidence creates a strong case for removal of user fees(More)
We did a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial of a participatory intervention with women's groups to improve birth outcomes in rural Nepal. The average provider cost of the women's group intervention was US0.75 dollars per person per year (0.90 dollars with health-service strengthening) in a population of 86,704. The(More)
In this paper, we take a broad perspective on maternal health and place it in its wider context. We draw attention to the economic and social vulnerability of pregnant women, and stress the importance of concomitant broader strategies, including poverty reduction and women's empowerment. We also consider outcomes beyond mortality, in particular, near-misses(More)
BACKGROUND Universal coverage of health care is now receiving substantial worldwide and national attention, but debate continues on the best mix of financing mechanisms, especially to protect people outside the formal employment sector. Crucial issues are the equity implications of different financing mechanisms, and patterns of service use. We report a(More)
BACKGROUND Timely reliable data on aid flows to maternal, newborn, and child health are essential for assessing the adequacy of current levels of funding, and to promote accountability among donors for attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for child and maternal health. We provide global estimates of official development assistance (ODA) to(More)
BACKGROUND To track donor assistance to maternal, newborn, and child health-related activities is necessary to assess progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 and to foster donor accountability. Our aim was to analyse aid flows to maternal, newborn, and child health for 2005 and 2006 and trends between 2003 and 2006. METHODS We analysed and(More)
Economic evaluation of health promotion programmes presents well documented challenges. These programmes often generate significant non-health benefits which are typically ignored within economic evaluation. This study explored the use of the contingent valuation (CV) method to value the broader benefits of a women's group programme to improve maternal and(More)