Joseph W. Boggs

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Activation of urethral or genital afferents of the pudendal nerve can elicit or inhibit micturition, and low frequency stimulation of the compound pudendal nerve (PN) is known to produce a continence response. The present study demonstrates that PN stimulation also can elicit a micturition-like response and that the response to PN stimulation is dependent(More)
PURPOSE Individuals with spinal cord injury or neurological disorders may have neurogenic detrusor contractions at low volumes (bladder hyperreflexia), which cause incontinence and can lead to significant health problems. Bladder contractions can be suppressed by electrical stimulation of inhibitory pathways but continuous activation may lead to habituation(More)
BACKGROUND Present treatment methods are often unsatisfactory in reducing post-amputation pain. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) could reduce the pain, but it is rarely used because present methods require invasive surgical access and precise placement of the leads in close proximity (≤ 2 mm) with the nerve. METHODS The present study investigated the(More)
Reflexes mediated by urethral sensory pathways are integral to urinary function. This study investigated the changes in bladder pressure and urethral sphincter activity resulting from electrical stimulation of afferents in the deep perineal nerve (DP), which innervates the urethra and surrounding muscles, before and after acute spinal cord transection (SCT)(More)
AIMS Individuals with spinal cord injury or neurological disorders may develop bladder contractions at low volumes (neurogenic detrusor overactivity), which can lead to significant health problems. Present devices can inhibit unwanted contractions through continuous electrical stimulation of sensory nerves, but do not enable conditional stimulation only at(More)
Persons with a suprasacral spinal cord injury cannot empty their bladder voluntarily. Bladder emptying can be restored by intermittent electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots (SR) to cause bladder contraction. However, this therapy requires sensory nerve transection to prevent dyssynergic contraction of the external urethral sphincter (EUS).(More)
The nervous system in patients with cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome appeared to be affected at various tissue levels. There was evidence of a migrational disorder manifested by polymicrogyria and lack of normal neuronal maturation. There was dysmyelination of the white matter associated with accumulation of neutral fat in astrocytes. Within the peripheral(More)
The present report describes the neuropathological change found in the brainstem of four patients who were treated with combined chemotherapy for various types of malignant disease. The change consists of localized axonal swellings, the socalled “axonal spheroids” located predominantly in the medial lemniscus, the fibers from the olivary nuclei and around(More)
Individuals with a spinal cord injury or neurological disorders may develop involuntary bladder contractions at low volumes (bladder hyper-reflexia), which can lead to significant health problems. Present devices can inhibit unwanted contractions through continuous stimulation, but do not enable conditional stimulation only at the onset of bladder(More)
Many amputees suffer from postamputation pain, which can be extremely debilitating, decrease quality of life, increase the risk of depression, and negatively affect interpersonal relationships and the ability to work. Present methods of treatment, including medications, are often unsatisfactory in reducing postamputation pain. Electrical stimulation of the(More)