Joseph Price

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Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by abnormal hair, teeth and bone. The main clinical manifestations of TDO include taurodontism, enamel hypoplasia, kinky, curly hair at birth and increased thickness and density of the cranial bones. These pleiotropic clinical features suggest the role of a developmental(More)
The major virulence factor of the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes is the M protein, which prevents phagocytosis of the bacterium. In different strains of streptococci, there are over 80 serologically different M proteins and there are additional M-like proteins, some of which bind immunoglobulins. Although the sequence of the M molecules(More)
Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) is characterised by a variable clinical phenotype primarily affecting the hair, teeth, and bone. Different clinical features are observed between and within TDO families. It is not known whether the variable clinical features are the result of genetic heterogeneity or clinical variability. A gene for TDO was localised(More)
Amelogenesis imperfecta of the hypomaturation-hypoplasia type with taurodontism (AIHHT) is inherited as a highly penetrant autosomal dominant trait. These dental findings are similar to those of another autosomal dominant condition, the tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO), from which AIHHT differs primarily by lack of changes in the hair and bones. TDO is(More)
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS Linkage and association studies in Caucasian patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus suggest that one or more diabetes susceptibility gene(s) reside within human chromosome 20q12-13.1. This region of chromosome 20 contains the maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 1 gene, HNF4 alpha. The purpose of this study was(More)
The alignment of genome linkage maps, defined primarily by segregation of sequence-tagged site (STS) markers, with BAC contig physical maps and full genome sequences requires high throughput mechanisms to identify BAC clones that contain specific STS. A powerful technique for this purpose is multi-dimensional hybridization of "overgo" probes. The probes are(More)
  • Joseph Price
  • Journal of biochemical and biophysical methods
  • 2007
Phospholipase A(2) is an important enzyme in various pathologies. Although fluorescent substrate assays for it have been recently developed, there is a need for an assay with inexpensive commercially available substrates, useful when samples interfered with fluorescent assays, that is nonisotopic, continuous, conducted at physiological pH, and in a 96 well(More)
Infection of animals with oncogenic viruses frequently leads to an immunosuppressed state. We have examined immunosuppression induced by an avian osteopetrosis virus, myeloblastosis-associated virus of subgroup B inducing osteopetrosis [MAV-2(O)], and our results suggest that this virus induces immunosuppression by a novel mechanism. Lymphoid cells from(More)
Several recent genetic studies have suggested linkage of Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) susceptibility to a region of chromosome 20q12-q13.1. To facilitate the identification and cloning of a diabetes susceptibility gene(s) in this region, we have constructed correlated radiation hybrid and YAC/BAC contig physical maps of the(More)
Aims/hypothesis. Linkage and association studies in Caucasian patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus suggest that one or more diabetes susceptibility gene(s) reside within human chromosome 20q12–13.1. This region of chromosome 20 contains the maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 1 gene, HNF4 α. The purpose of this study was to(More)