Learn More
Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to noninvasively monitor adult human brain function in a wide variety of tasks. While rough spatial correspondences with maps generated from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been found in such experiments, the amplitude correspondences between the two recording modalities have not been fully(More)
Functional neuroimaging is a vital element of neuroscience and cognitive research and, increasingly, is an important clinical tool. Diffuse optical imaging is an emerging, noninvasive technique with unique portability and hemodynamic contrast capabilities for mapping brain function in young subjects and subjects in enriched or clinical environments. We have(More)
Despite the unique brain imaging capabilities and advantages of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), including portability and comprehensive hemodynamic measurement, widespread acceptance in the neuroimaging community has been hampered by low spatial resolution and image localization errors. While recent technical developments such as high-density(More)
Functional neuroimaging commands a dominant role in current neuroscience research. However its use in bedside clinical and certain neuro-scientific studies has been limited because the current tools lack the combination of being non-invasive, non-ionizing and portable while maintaining moderate resolution and localization accuracy. Optical neuroimaging(More)
Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an attractive approach for evaluating stroke physiology. It provides hemodynamic and metabolic imaging with unique potential for continuous noninvasive bedside imaging in humans. To date there have been few quantitative spatial-temporal studies of stroke pathophysiology based on diffuse optical signatures. The authors(More)
We have performed a noninvasive bilateral optical imaging study of the hemodynamic evoked response to unilateral finger opposition task, finger tactile, and electrical median nerve stimulation in the human sensorimotor cortex. This optical study shows the hemoglobin-evoked response to voluntary and nonvoluntary stimuli. We performed measurements on 10(More)
Mapping resting-state networks allows insight into the brain's functional architecture and physiology and has rapidly become important in contemporary neuroscience research. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging functional neuroimaging technique with the advantages, relative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), of portability and the(More)
The time courses of oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO2]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HbR]) and total haemoglobin ([HbT]) concentration changes following cortical activation in rats by electrical forepaw stimulation were measured using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and compared to similar measurements performed previously with fMRI at 2.0 T and 4.7 T. We also explored the(More)
Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a portable monitor of cerebral hemodynamics with wide clinical potential. However, in fNIRS, the vascular signal from the brain is often obscured by vascular signals present in the scalp and skull. In this paper, we evaluate two methods for improving in vivo data from adult human subjects through the use of(More)
The development of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) instrumentation for neuroimaging of humans is challenging due to the large size and the geometry of the head and the desire to distinguish signals at different depths. One approach to this problem is to use dense imaging arrays that incorporate measurements at different source-detector distances. We(More)