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BACKGROUND Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase(More)
Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain(More)
BACKGROUND Children with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome are prone to the development of optic pathway gliomas resulting from biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene. Recent studies have revealed the presence of other molecular alterations in a small portion of these NF1-associated brain tumors. The purpose of this study was(More)
Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop low-grade brain tumors throughout the optic pathway. Nearly 50% of children with optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) experience visual impairment, and few regain their vision after chemotherapy. Recent studies have revealed that girls with optic nerve gliomas are five times more likely to lose vision and require(More)
BACKGROUND Optic gliomas arising in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome cause reduced visual acuity in 30%-50% of affected children. Since human specimens are rare, genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models have been successfully employed for preclinical therapeutic discovery and validation. However, the sequence of cellular(More)
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