José Fernando Casquel Monti

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Partial enzymatic hydrolysis of whey protein by trypsin increased solubility of this protein in water. Water-insoluble, heat-denaturated whey protein was solubilized fully by trypsinization. Optimal conditions for the enzyme reaction, established by the pH-stat technique, were: digestion at pH 8.0 and 55 C for approximately 3 h, at an enzyme-substrate ratio(More)
Human milk samples react against anti-bovine beta-lactoglobulin rabbit antibodies, as measured by a competitive radioimmunoassay. Immunoreactivity was positive even in milk from mothers consuming a diet free of cow's milk. An increase with a diet rich in cow's milk proteins was detected by immunoelectrophoresis. The human milk fraction cross-reacting with(More)
Enzymatic in vitro hydrolysis was evaluated as a possible treatment to abolish the allergenicity of whey proteins in view of their use in infant formulas. Guinea pigs without prior immunological contact (including fetal life) with cow's milk were fed various preparations of cow's milk proteins. Oral exposure to milk or untreated whey protein led to(More)
A strong lytic activity against Micrococcus luteus was demonstrated in abomasal secretions from calf, adult cattle, goat and sheep. This bacteriolytic activity was undetectable in other secretions. Bacteriolysis was caused by a glycosidase displaying endo-N-acetylmuramoylhydrolase specificity (EC 3.2.1.17) and was further characterized in the calf. This(More)
Human milk samples react against anti-bovineβ-lactoglobulin rabbit antibodies, as measured by a competitive radioimmunoassay. Immunoreactivity was positive even in milk from mothers consuming a diet free of cow's milk. An increase with a diet rich in cow's milk proteins was detected by immunoelectrophoresis. The human milk fraction cross-reacting with(More)
Because food allergy is frequent and severe, all possible means should be used to try to prevent its manifestations or at least to delay them until the child is older and stronger and therefore better able to follow an exclusion diet. The capacity of breast-feeding for preventing food allergy has been challenged in the past, but a consensus seems to be(More)