José Alberto Cocilovo

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The present paper studies the evolutionary process operating on prehistoric groups from the Azapa valley and coast (northern Chile). The sample consists of 237 crania from the Archaic Late, Early Intermediate, Middle, Late Intermediate, and Late periods. Six metric variables were used, which were transformed to eliminate the special environmental component(More)
The phenotypic variance (V(P)) may be divided into the genetic variance (V(G)), the general environmental variance (V(Eg)), and the special environmental variance (V(Es)). The latter is estimated through repeatability calculation (b). This value is considered the upper limit of heritability and represents maximum genetic variance proportion (V(Gm) = V(G) +(More)
Mahalanobis D2 statistics (with size and shape components) were computed for nine craniometric variables among five prehistoric groups representing steps in the microevolutionary history of a coastal population in Northern Chile. Roughly 80% of craniometric variation was found to be explained by chronologic distance covering a period of roughly 6500 years.(More)
The peopling of the south-central Andean region can be determined by exploring a combination of cultural, economic, and biological factors that influence the structure of populations and determine particular dispersals of gene frequencies. Quantitative characters from 1,586 adult crania of both sexes from northern Chile, northwestern Argentina, and the(More)
The existing biocultural links are analyzed among ancient inhabitants of the Cochabamba valleys (Bolivia) from the Formative and Tiwanaku periods, coastal and inland Azapa region (Chile) from the Late Archaic to the Late periods, and the Atacama Desert oases (Chile) from the Formative period to the time of European contact. Craniometric information obtained(More)
Multivariate distance statistics were computed from 14 nonmetrical cranial variables among five prehistoric samples representing steps in the microevolutionary history of a coastal population in northern Chile. Roughly 70% of nonmetrical cranial variation was found to be explained by chronologic distance covering a period of 6,500 years. This estimate is(More)
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