Jonathan Sewall

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Intelligent Tutoring Systems have been shown to be effective in a number of domains, but they remain hard to build, with estimates of 200-300 hours of development per hour of instruction. Two goals of the Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT) project are to (a) make tutor development more efficient for both programmers and non-programmers and (b) produce(More)
The Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT) support creation of a novel type of tutors called example-tracing tutors. Unlike other types of ITSs (e.g., model-tracing tutors, constraint-based tutors), exampletracing tutors evaluate student behavior by flexibly comparing it against generalized examples of problemsolving behavior. Example-tracing tutors are(More)
Authoring tools for intelligent tutoring systems are especially valuable if they not only provide a rich set of options for the efficient authoring of tutoring systems but also support controlled experiments in which the added educational value of new tutor features is evaluated. The cognitive tutor authoring tools (CTAT) provide both. Using CTAT,(More)
Intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs), which provide step-by-step guidance to students in complex problem-solving activities, have been shown to enhance student learning in a range of domains. However, they tend to be difficult to build. Our project investigates whether the process of authoring an ITS can be simplified, while at the same time maintaining the(More)
Key success criteria for an ITS authoring tool are that (1) the tool supports the creation of effective tutoring systems, (2) the tool can be used to build tutors across a wide range of application domains, (3) authoring with the tool is cost-effective, (4) the tool supports easy deployment and delivery of tutors in a variety of technical contexts, (5)(More)
Our long-term research goal is to provide cognitive tutoring of collaboration within a collaborative software environment. This is a challenging goal, as intelligent tutors have traditionally focused on cognitive skills, rather than on the skills necessary to collaborate successfully. In this paper, we describe progress we have made toward this goal. Our(More)
In this paper, we describe developmental and empirical steps we have taken toward providing Cognitive Tutoring to students within a collaborative software environment. We have taken two important steps toward realizing this goal. First, we have integrated a collaborative software tool, Cool Modes, with software designed to develop Cognitive Tutors (the(More)
SimStudent is a machine-learning agent that learns cognitive skills by demonstration. It was originally developed as a building block of the Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT), so that the authors do not have to build a cognitive model by hand, but instead simply demonstrate solutions for SimStudent to automatically generate a cognitive model. The(More)
In this paper, we describe progress we have made toward providing cognitive tutoring to students within a collaborative software environment. First, we have integrated a collaborative software tool, Cool Modes, with software designed to develop Cognitive Tutors (the Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tool). Our initial integration provides a means to capture data(More)
In 2009, we reported on a new Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) technology, example-tracing tutors, that can be built without programming using the Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT). Creating example-tracing tutors was shown to be 4–8 times as cost-effective as estimates for ITS development from the literature. Since 2009, CTAT and its associated(More)