John van den Dobbelsteen

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One generally has the impression that one feels one's hand at the same location as one sees it. However, because our brain deals with possibly conflicting visual and proprioceptive information about hand position by combining it into an optimal estimate of the hand's location, mutual calibration is not necessary to achieve such a coherent percept. Does(More)
We investigated the extent to which humans can quickly adapt their goal-directed arm movements to perturbed feedback. We predicted that the magnitude of adaptation to a changed relationship between vision and kinesthesia would depend on the type of perturbation, being largest when the perturbation can be generalized within egocentric frames of reference. To(More)
Reaching out for objects with an unseen arm involves using both visual and kinesthetic information. Neither visual nor kinesthetic information is perfect. Each is subject to both constant and variable errors. To evaluate how such errors influence performance in natural goal-directed movements, we asked subjects to align a real 5-cm cube, which they held in(More)
Previous research has shown that humans generalize distortions of visuomotor feedback in terms of egocentric rotations. We examined whether these rotations are linked to the orientation of the eyes or of the shoulder of the arm that was used. Subjects moved a hand-held cube between target locations in a sequence of adaptation and test phases. During(More)
The grasping instruments used in minimally invasive surgery reduce the ability of the surgeon to feel the forces applied on the tissue, thereby complicating the handling of the tissue and increasing the risk of tissue damage. Force sensors implemented in the forceps of the instruments enable accurate measurements of applied forces, but also complicate the(More)
BACKGROUND To improve endoscopic surgical skills, an increasing number of surgical residents practice on box or virtual-reality (VR) trainers. Current training is mainly focused on hand-eye coordination. Training methods that focus on applying the right amount of force are not yet available. METHODS The aim of this project is to develop a system to(More)
BACKGROUND To improve endoscopic surgical skills, an increasing number of surgical residents practice on box or virtual reality (VR) trainers. Current training is focused mainly on hand-eye coordination. Training methods that focus on applying the right amount of force are not yet available. METHODS The aim of this project is to develop a low-cost(More)
Information technology, such as real-time location (RTL) systems using Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) may contribute to overcome patient safety issues and high costs in healthcare. The aim of this work is to study if a RFID specific Participatory Design (PD) approach supports the design and the implementation of RTL systems in the Operating Room(More)
When equipped with motion and force sensors, box-trainers can be good alternatives for relatively expensive Virtual Reality (VR) trainers. As in VR trainers, the sensors in a box trainer could provide the trainee with objective information about his performance. Recently, multiple tracking systems were developed for classification of participants based on(More)