John Tumpane

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The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction has been used for the template-mediated chemical ligation of two oligonucleotide strands, one with a 5'-alkyne and the other with a 3'-azide, to produce a DNA strand with an unnatural backbone at the ligation point. A template-free click-ligation reaction has been used for the intramolecular(More)
Here, we present the formation of a fully addressable DNA nanostructure that shows the potential to be exploited as, for example, an information storage device based on pH-driven triplex strand formation or nanoscale circuits based on electron transfer. The nanostructure is composed of two adjacent hexagonal unit cells (analogous to naphthalene) in which(More)
In this work we examine the trapping and conversion of visible light energy into chemical energy using a supramolecular assembly. The assembly consists of a light-absorbing antenna and a porphyrin redox center, which are covalently attached to two complementary 14-mer DNA strands, hybridized to form a double helix and anchored to a lipid membrane. The(More)
The use of nucleic acids as a nanomaterial is becoming increasingly widespread due to the suitability of the hydrogen-bonding patterns and sequence specificity inherent to the double-helix. As minimisation of size becomes ever more important it is imperative to employ nucleic acids in the most efficient and functional manner possible. To this end we have(More)
The inherent self-assembly properties of DNA make it ideal in nanotechnology. We present a fully addressable DNA nanostructure with the smallest possible unit cell, a hexagon with a side-length of only 3.4 nm.(2,3) Using novel three-way oligonucleotides, where each side has a unique double-stranded DNA sequence that can be assigned a specific address, we(More)
In this work the trapping and conversion of visible light energy into chemical energy is examined using a supramolecular assembly. This consists of a light absorbing antenna and a porphyrin redox centre both covalently attached to a DNA strand, which in turn is bound to a lipid membrane. The excitation energy is finally trapped as a benzoquinone radical(More)
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