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Ubiquitin-positive, tau- and alpha-synuclein-negative inclusions are hallmarks of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Although the identity of the ubiquitinated protein specific to either disorder was unknown, we showed that TDP-43 is the major disease protein in both disorders. Pathologic(More)
With increasing life expectancy in developed countries, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its socioeconomic impact are growing. Increasing knowledge of the mechanisms of AD facilitates the development of treatment strategies aimed at slowing down or preventing neuronal death. AD treatment trials using clinical outcome measures require long(More)
Thirteen families have been described with an autosomal dominantly inherited dementia named frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), historically termed Pick's disease. Most FTDP-17 cases show neuronal and/or glial inclusions that stain positively with antibodies raised against the microtubule-associated protein Tau,(More)
Currently available evidence strongly supports the position that the initiating event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to abnormal processing of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide, ultimately leading to formation of Abeta plaques in the brain. This process occurs while individuals are still cognitively normal. Biomarkers of brain beta-amyloidosis are(More)
Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies, but earlier pathologies may herald disease onset. To investigate this, we studied wild-type and P301S mutant human tau transgenic (Tg) mice. Filamentous tau lesions developed in P301S Tg mice at 6 months of age, and progressively accumulated in association with(More)
With the increasing life expectancy in developed countries, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus its socioeconomic impact are growing. Increasing knowledge over the last years about the pathomechanisms involved in AD allow for the development of specific treatment strategies aimed at slowing down or even preventing neuronal death in AD.(More)
BACKGROUND A consensus conference on multiple system atrophy (MSA) in 1998 established criteria for diagnosis that have been accepted widely. Since then, clinical, laboratory, neuropathologic, and imaging studies have advanced the field, requiring a fresh evaluation of diagnostic criteria. We held a second consensus conference in 2007 and present the(More)
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns were examined together with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in serial scans of Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The SPARE-AD score, summarizing brain atrophy patterns, was tested as a predictor of short-term conversion to Alzheimer's disease(More)
In 2010, we put forward a hypothetical model of the major biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The model was received with interest because we described the temporal evolution of AD biomarkers in relation to each other and to the onset and progression of clinical symptoms. Since then, evidence has accumulated that supports the major assumptions of this(More)
The defining neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease are abundant filamentous tau lesions and deposits of fibrillar amyloid beta peptides. Prominent filamentous tau inclusions and brain degeneration in the absence of beta-amyloid deposits are also hallmarks of neurodegenerative tauopathies exemplified by sporadic corticobasal degeneration,(More)