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  • Manuela Neumann, Deepak M Sampathu, Linda K Kwong, Adam C Truax, Matthew C Micsenyi, Thomas T Chou +13 others
  • 2006
Ubiquitin-positive, tau- and alpha-synuclein-negative inclusions are hallmarks of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Although the identity of the ubiquitinated protein specific to either disorder was unknown, we showed that TDP-43 is the major disease protein in both disorders. Pathologic(More)
With increasing life expectancy in developed countries, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its socioeconomic impact are growing. Increasing knowledge of the mechanisms of AD facilitates the development of treatment strategies aimed at slowing down or preventing neuronal death. AD treatment trials using clinical outcome measures require long(More)
With the increasing life expectancy in developed countries, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus its socioeconomic impact are growing. Increasing knowledge over the last years about the pathomechanisms involved in AD allow for the development of specific treatment strategies aimed at slowing down or even preventing neuronal death in AD.(More)
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns were examined together with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in serial scans of Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The SPARE-AD score, summarizing brain atrophy patterns, was tested as a predictor of short-term conversion to Alzheimer's disease(More)
One year ago, in this journal, we published a recommended nomenclature for the neuropathologic subtypes of fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) [7]. A major impetus behind this was to resolve the confusion that had arisen around the use of the term ''FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions'' (FTLD-U), following the discovery that the molecular pathology of(More)
Studies in animal models have shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces the rapid accumulation of many of the same key proteins that form pathologic aggregates in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we examined whether this rapid process also occurs in humans after TBI. Brain tissue from 18 cases who died after TBI and from 6 control cases was examined(More)
Currently available evidence strongly supports the position that the initiating event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to abnormal processing of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide, ultimately leading to formation of Abeta plaques in the brain. This process occurs while individuals are still cognitively normal. Biomarkers of brain beta-amyloidosis are(More)
  • Yasumasa Yoshiyama, Makoto Higuchi, Bin Zhang, Shu-Ming Huang, Nobuhisa Iwata, Takaomi C. Saido +4 others
  • 2007
Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies, but earlier pathologies may herald disease onset. To investigate this, we studied wild-type and P301S mutant human tau transgenic (Tg) mice. Filamentous tau lesions developed in P301S Tg mice at 6 months of age, and progressively accumulated in association with(More)
The causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating human neurodegenerative disease, are poorly understood, although the protein TDP-43 has been suggested to have a critical role in disease pathogenesis. Here we show that ataxin 2 (ATXN2), a polyglutamine (polyQ) protein mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, is a potent modifier of TDP-43(More)
In 2010, we put forward a hypothetical model of the major biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The model was received with interest because we described the temporal evolution of AD biomarkers in relation to each other and to the onset and progression of clinical symptoms. Since then, evidence has accumulated that supports the major assumptions of this(More)