Learn More
Diseases affecting the cornea are a major cause of blindness worldwide, second only to cataract in overall importance. The epidemiology of corneal blindness is complicated and encompasses a wide variety of infectious and inflammatory eye diseses that cause corneal scarring, which ultimately leads to functional blindness. In addition, the prevalence of(More)
AIMS/BACKGROUND To determine the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors predisposing to corneal ulceration in Madurai, south India, and to identify the specific pathogenic organisms responsible for infection. METHODS All patients with suspected infectious central corneal ulceration presenting to the ocular microbiology and cornea service at(More)
CONTEXT Treatment recommendations assume that repeated mass antibiotic distributions can control, but not eradicate or even locally eliminate, the ocular strains of chlamydia that cause trachoma. Elimination may be an important end point because of concern that infection will return to communities that have lost immunity to chlamydia after antibiotics are(More)
Photoreceptor degeneration in inherited retinal dystrophy delayed by basic fibroblast growth factor. vector-mediated in vivo gene transfer into adult murine retina. In vivo transfer of a reporter gene to the retina mediated by an adenoviral vector. virus delivery of an opsin promoter driven reporter gene to the mouse and rabbit retina. Gene transfer into(More)
BACKGROUND The World Health Organization recommends periodic mass antibiotic distributions to reduce the ocular strains of chlamydia that cause trachoma, the world's leading cause of infectious blindness. Their stated goal is to control infection, not to completely eliminate it. A single mass distribution can dramatically reduce the prevalence of infection.(More)
AIMS To determine the incidence of ocular trauma and corneal ulceration in the district of Bhaktapur in Kathmandu Valley, and to determine whether or not topical antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent the development of ulceration after corneal abrasion. METHODS A defined population of 34 902 individuals was closely followed prospectively for 2 years by 81(More)
BACKGROUND Trachoma-control programmes distribute oral azithromycin to treat the ocular strains of chlamydia that cause the disease and to control infection. Theoretically, elimination of infection is feasible if untreated individuals receive an indirect protective effect from living in repeatedly treated communities, which is similar to herd protection in(More)
BACKGROUND Antibiotics are a major tool in the WHO's trachoma control program. Even a single mass distribution reduces the prevalence of the ocular chlamydia that causes trachoma. Unfortunately, infection returns after a single treatment, at least in severely affected areas. Here, we test whether additional scheduled treatments further reduce infection, and(More)
The common wisdom is that a trachoma program cannot eliminate ocular chlamydia from a community, just reduce infection to a level where blindness would be minimal. We describe the success of multiple mass antibiotic treatments, demonstrating that complete elimination of infection may be an attainable goal in an area with modest disease.
  • K Miller, N Pakpour, +10 authors T Lietman
  • 2004
AIM Face seeking flies have long been thought to transmit Chlamydia trachomatis, the causative agent of trachoma, but this has never been proven. The four criteria proposed by Barnett, previously used to incriminate other arthropods suspected of transmitting disease, were examined. One of these criteria remains unmet: the repeated demonstration of the(More)