John M. Prager

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IBM Research undertook a challenge to build a computer system that could compete at the human champion level in real time on the American TV quiz show, Jeopardy. The extent of the challenge includes fielding a real-time automatic contestant on the show, not merely a laboratory exercise. The Jeopardy Challenge helped us address requirements that led to the(More)
Watson reads a clue A. Lally J. M. Prager M. C. McCord B. K. Boguraev S. Patwardhan J. Fan P. Fodor J. Chu-Carroll The first stage of processing in the IBM Watsoni system is to perform a detailed analysis of the question in order to determine what it is asking for and how best to approach answering it. Question analysis uses Watson’s parsing and semantic(More)
James Allan (editor), Jay Aslam, Nicholas Belkin, Chris Buckley, Jamie Callan, Bruce Croft (editor), Sue Dumais, Norbert Fuhr, Donna Harman, David J. Harper, Djoerd Hiemstra, Thomas Hofmann, Eduard Hovy, Wessel Kraaij, John Lafferty, Victor Lavrenko, David Lewis, Liz Liddy, R. Manmatha, Andrew McCallum, Jay Ponte, John Prager, Dragomir Radev, Philip Resnik,(More)
Motivated by the success of ensemble methods in machine learning and other areas of natural language processing, we developed a multistrategy and multi-source approach to question answering which is based on combining the results from different answering agents searching for answers in multiple corpora. The answering agents adopt fundamentally different(More)
Traditional question answering systems typically employ a single pipeline architecture, consisting roughly of three components: question analysis, search, and answer selection (see e.g., (Clarke et al., 2001a; Hovy et al., 2000; Moldovan et al., 2000; Prager et al., 2000)). The knowledge sources utilized by these systems to date primarily focus on the(More)
James Allan (editor), Jay Aslam, Nicholas Belkin, Chris Buckley, Jarnie Callan, Bruce Croft (editor), Sue Dumais, Norbert Fuhr, Donna Harman, David J. Harper, Djoerd Hiemstra, Thomas Hofmann, Eduard Hovy, Wessel Kraaij, John Lafferty, Victor Lavrenko, David Lewis, Liz Liddy, R. Manmatha, Andrew McCallum, Jay Ponte, John Prager, Dragomir Radev, Philip(More)
We present a preliminary analysis of the use of WordNet hypernyms for answering “What-is” questions. We analyse the approximately 130 definitional questions in the TREC10 corpus with respect to our technique of Virtual Annotation (VA), which has previously been shown to be effective on the TREC9 definitional question set and other questions. We discover(More)