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  • John L Davy
  • 2009
In his 1942 paper on the sound insulation of single leaf walls, Cremer [(1942). Akust. Z. 7, 81-104] made a number of approximations in order to show the general trend of sound insulation above the critical frequency. Cremer realized that these approximations limited the application of his theory to frequencies greater than twice the critical frequency.(More)
  • John L Davy
  • 2010
This paper presents a revised theory for predicting the sound insulation of double leaf cavity walls that removes an approximation, which is usually made when deriving the sound insulation of a double leaf cavity wall above the critical frequencies of the wall leaves due to the airborne transmission across the wall cavity. This revised theory is also used(More)
The effect of the resilience of the steel studs on the sound insulation of steel stud cavity walls can be modeled as an equivalent translational compliance in simple models for predicting the sound insulation of walls. Recent numerical calculations have shown that this equivalent translational compliance varies with frequency. This paper determines the(More)
  • John L Davy
  • 2009
This paper presents a method for calculating the directivity of the radiation of sound from a panel or opening, whose vibration is forced by the incidence of sound from the other side. The directivity of the radiation depends on the angular distribution of the incident sound energy in the room or duct in whose wall or end the panel or opening occurs. The(More)
Current theories for predicting the sound insulation of orthotropic materials are limited to a small range of infinite panels. This paper presents a method that allows for the prediction of the sound insulation of a finite size orthotropic panel. This method uses an equation for the forced radiation impedance of a finite size rectangular panel. This(More)
  • John L Davy
  • 2009
The radiation efficiency of an infinite flat panel that radiates a plane wave into a half space is equal to the inverse of the cosine of the angle between the direction of propagation of the plane wave and the normal to the panel. The fact that this radiation efficiency tends to infinity as the angle tends to 90 degrees causes problems with simple theories(More)
The average specific forced radiation wave impedance of a finite rectangular panel is of importance for the prediction of both sound insulation and sound absorption. In 1982, Thomasson published numerical calculations of the average specific forced radiation wave impedance of a square of side length 2e for wave number k in half octave steps of ke from 0.25(More)
Although reliable methods exist to predict the apparent sound reduction index of heavy, homogeneous isotopic building constructions, these methods are not appropriate for use with lightweight building constructions which typically have critical frequencies in or above the frequency range of interest. Three main methods have been proposed for extending the(More)
Models for the statistics of responses in finite reverberant structures, and in particular, for the variance of the mean square pressure in reverberation rooms, have been studied for decades. It is therefore surprising that a recent communication has claimed that the literature has gotten the simplest of such calculations very wrong. Monsef, Cozza,(More)
Theories used to predict the sound insulation of double-leaf cavity wall systems are usually based on the assumption that the wall is of an infinite extent. To account for the effect of the finite extent of the wall, limiting the angle of incidence, a finite radiation efficiency model or the spatial windowing method is used in order to obtain realistic(More)