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The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 caused the release of high levels of airborne pollutants into the local environment. To assess the toxicity of fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)], which may adversely affect the health of workers and(More)
Chronic bronchitis may be considered a risk factor in particulate matter (PM)-induced morbidity. We hypothesized that a rat model of human bronchitis would be more susceptible to the pulmonary effects of concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from Research Triangle Park, NC. Bronchitis was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (90-100 days of age) by exposure(More)
Several studies have reported health effects of concentrated ambient particles (CAP) in rodents and humans; however, toxicity end points in rodents have provided inconsistent results. In 2000 we conducted six 1-day exposure studies where spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were exposed to filtered air or CAPs (< or = 2.5 microm, 1,138-1,765 microg/m3) for(More)
Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley(More)
Epidemiologic reports by C.A. Pope III et. al. demonstrated that in the Utah Valley, closure of an open-hearth steel mill over the winter of 1987 was associated with reductions in respiratory disease and related hospital admissions in valley residents. To better examine the relationship between plant-associated changes in ambient particulate matter (PM) and(More)
BACKGROUND Epidemiologic studies have reported an association between proximity to highway traffic and increased cardiopulmonary illnesses. OBJECTIVES We investigated the effect of size-fractionated particulate matter (PM), obtained at different distances from a highway, on acute cardiopulmonary toxicity in mice. METHODS We collected PM for 2 weeks in(More)
Risk assessments often must consider exposures that vary over time or for which the exposure duration of concern differs from the available data, and a variety of extrapolation procedures have been devised accordingly. The present experiments explore the relationship(s) between exposure concentration (C) and time (t) to investigate procedures for assessing(More)
A plethora of epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to elevated levels of ambient particulate matter (PM) can lead to adverse health outcomes, including cardiopulmonary-related mortality. Subsequent animal toxicological studies have attempted to mimic these cardiovascular and respiratory responses, in order to better understand underlying(More)
BACKGROUND Epidemiological studies have reported increased risks of cardiopulmonary-related hospitalization and death in association with exposure to elevated levels of particulate matter (PM) across a wide range of urban areas. In response to these findings, researchers have conducted animal inhalation exposures aimed at reproducing the observed(More)
Emissions from a large peat fire in North Carolina in 2008 were associated with increased hospital admissions for asthma and the rate of heart failure in the exposed population. Peat fires often produce larger amounts of smoke and last longer than forest fires, however few studies have reported on their toxicity. Moreover, reliable alternatives to(More)