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In recent years, molecular biologists have uncovered a wealth of information about the proteins controlling cell growth and division in eukaryotes. The regulatory system is so complex that it defies understanding by verbal arguments alone. Quantitative tools are necessary to probe reliably into the details of cell cycle control. To this end, we convert(More)
The physiological responses of cells to external and internal stimuli are governed by genes and proteins interacting in complex networks whose dynamical properties are impossible to understand by intuitive reasoning alone. Recent advances by theoretical biologists have demonstrated that molecular regulatory networks can be accurately modeled in mathematical(More)
The adaptive responses of a living cell to internal and external signals are controlled by networks of proteins whose interactions are so complex that the functional integration of the network cannot be comprehended by intuitive reasoning alone. Mathematical modeling, based on biochemical rate equations, provides a rigorous and reliable tool for unraveling(More)
The molecular machinery of cell cycle control is known in more detail for budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, than for any other eukaryotic organism. In recent years, many elegant experiments on budding yeast have dissected the roles of cyclin molecules (Cln1-3 and Clb1-6) in coordinating the events of DNA synthesis, bud emergence, spindle formation,(More)
Cellular rhythms are generated by complex interactions among genes, proteins and metabolites. They are used to control every aspect of cell physiology, from signalling, motility and development to growth, division and death. We consider specific examples of oscillatory processes and discuss four general requirements for biochemical oscillations: negative(More)
  • J J Tyson
  • 1991
The proteins cdc2 and cyclin form a heterodimer (maturation promoting factor) that controls the major events of the cell cycle. A mathematical model for the interactions of cdc2 and cyclin is constructed. Simulation and analysis of the model show that the control system can operate in three modes: as a steady state with high maturation promoting factor(More)
To contribute to a deeper understanding of M-phase control in eukaryotic cells, we have constructed a model based on the biochemistry of M-phase promoting factor (MPF) in Xenopus oocyte extracts, where there is evidence for two positive feedback loops (MPF stimulates its own production by activating Cdc25 and inhibiting Wee1) and a negative feedback loop(More)
Many organisms display rhythms of physiology and behavior that are entrained to the 24-h cycle of light and darkness prevailing on Earth. Under constant conditions of illumination and temperature, these internal biological rhythms persist with a period close to 1 day ("circadian"), but it is usually not exactly 24h. Recent discoveries have uncovered(More)
Cells progressing through the cell cycle must commit irreversibly to mitosis without slipping back to interphase before properly segregating their chromosomes. A mathematical model of cell-cycle progression in cell-free egg extracts from frog predicts that irreversible transitions into and out of mitosis are driven by hysteresis in the molecular control(More)
Complex assemblies of interacting proteins carry out most of the interesting jobs in a cell, such as metabolism, DNA synthesis, movement and information processing. These physiological properties play out as a subtle molecular dance, choreographed by underlying regulatory networks. To understand this dance, a new breed of theoretical molecular biologists(More)