John J. Riggins

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Little research has been conducted to investigate interactions between the invasive Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, and pine bark beetles native to the southeastern United States. Facilitative interactions between these organisms could alter stand dynamics and impact wood utilization strategies. American Wood Protection(More)
Few studies have focused on interactions between subterranean termites and the ophiostomatoid fungal associates of pine bark beetles or root feeding weevils. Field stake tests were employed at four locations throughout Mississippi to determine the feeding preference of subterranean termites for blue-stained, unstained, and partially decayed southern pine(More)
Surprisingly little research has been conducted to investigate interactions between subterranean termites and bark beetles. Facilitative interactions between these organisms could easily alter stand dynamics and impact wood utilization strategies. A series of American Wood Protection Association Standard E1-09 “choice tests” were carried out to determine(More)
Although much research has examined the process of prey capture by tiger beetles, an underlying assumption in this work is that tiger beetles are principally, or even exclusively, visual predators. Because this assumption is untested, we performed a series of experiments on four diurnally active tiger beetles in the Genus Cicindela. Individual beetles were(More)
The United States has a rich fauna of native Siricidae (wood wasps), but they are rarely studied because they have limited economic impact. In 2004, a non-native wood-boring pest, Sirex noctilio F., was found established in North America. Because S. noctilio is an economically important pest in pine plantations throughout the Southern Hemisphere, interest(More)
Laurel wilt is an extraordinarily destructive exotic tree disease in the southeastern United States that involves new-encounter hosts in the Lauraceae, an introduced vector (Xyleborus glabratus) and pathogen symbiont (Raffaelea lauricola). USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data were used to estimate that over 300 million trees of redbay(More)
Many bluestain (ophiostomatoid) fungi are inoculated into trees via bark beetle activity, but their ecological roles are not fully understood, particularly for interactions with invertebrates outside bark beetle and phoretic mite associations. Recently, correlational field studies and small-scale laboratory feeding trials have demonstrated subterranean(More)
Sirex nigricornis F. (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) is an innocuous pine-inhabiting woodwasp native to eastern North America, utilizing dead or dying pine trees as hosts. Although S. nigricornis F. does not cause economic damage, a closely related species, Sirex noctilio, was discovered in New York in 2004 and has continually spread throughout the northeastern(More)
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