Learn More
Cetacean (dolphin, whale, and porpoise) brains are among the least studied mammalian brains because of the formidable challenge of collecting and histologically preparing such relatively rare and large specimens. Magnetic resonance imaging offers a means of observing the internal structure of the brain when traditional histological procedures are not(More)
Magnetic resonance imaging offers a means of observing the internal structure of the brain where traditional procedures of embedding, sectioning, staining, mounting, and microscopic examination of thousands of sections are not practical. Furthermore, internal structures can be analyzed in their precise quantitative spatial interrelationships, which is(More)
To demonstrate the kinds of data that can be obtained non-destructively and non-invasively from preserved museum specimens using modern imaging technology the head region of a whole body fetal specimen of the common dolphin, Delphinus delphis, aged 8-9 months post-conception, was scanned using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Series of scans were obtained(More)
High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain of an adult spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris orientalis) were acquired in the coronal plane at 55 antero-posterior levels. From these scans a computer-generated set of resectioned virtual images in the two remaining orthogonal planes was constructed with the use of the VoxelView and VoxelMath(More)
Members of the order Sirenia are unique among mammals in being the only totally aquatic herbivores. They display correspondingly specialized physiological, behavioral and anatomical features. There have been few reports concerning sirenian neuroanatomy, and most of these have consisted of gross anatomical observations. Our interest in Sirenia stems from the(More)
Cetacean (dolphin, whale and porpoise) brains are among the least studied mammalian brains because of the difficulty of collecting and histologically preparing such relatively rare and large specimens. Among cetaceans, there exist relatively few studies of the brain of the dwarf sperm whale (Kogia simus). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a means of(More)
Cetacean (dolphin, whale, and porpoise) brains are among the least-studied mammalian brains because of the formidability of collecting and histologically preparing such relatively rare and large specimens. Among cetaceans, there exist relatively few studies of the brain of the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a(More)
In raccoons the somatic sensory neocortex is greatly expanded, with separate gyral crowns devoted to and intervening sulci separating, sensory representations of separate body parts, most strikingly those of the volar surfaces of individual forepaw digits. Most of the cortex in this region is buried in widely ramifying sulcal walls, wherein sensory(More)
We have assembled data on nine brain traits, in addition to the fifteen we have previously described, which provide new evidence for assessing mammalian relationships. States of these characters are tabulated as they occur in each of 152 mammalian species, providing data in numerically ordered form, useful for multiple analyses of phylogenetic relationships(More)
The localization and organization of primary (SmI) and secondary (SmI) somatic sensory cortical regions in agoutis, have been studied with micro- and macroelectrode-evoked potential techniques. For SmI, the mean surface area determined using microelectrodes was 13% smaller than that obtained using macroelectrodes. The location and organization of SmI are(More)