John Ellard

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  • J Ellard
  • The Australian and New Zealand journal of…
  • 1985
The author argues that the practice of psychiatry is impeded by a central paradox. On the one hand, psychiatry cannot develop unless the methods of science are used to unravel its problems. On the other, a significant part of what has been advanced as science is of little value and has done no more than divert attention from the important non-scientific(More)
  • J Ellard
  • The Australian and New Zealand journal of…
  • 1987
Madness has resisted a satisfactory categorisation for 2,000 years or more. During the last century attempts to define and understand schizophrenia as an entity within that disorder have failed. This article explores some of the reasons why this may have happened, in particular considering whether the syndrome that we now call schizophrenia has changed in(More)
  • J Ellard
  • The Australian and New Zealand journal of…
  • 1988
Psychiatric taxonomies, always a little uncertain, are most confused and illogical when they endeavour to encompass the moral and legal aspects of human behaviour. The concept of moral insanity represented a step backwards when it came into being, but it has persisted for a century and a half, changing only its title. Its creation and its subsequent history(More)