John B. Donnelly

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This paper is concerned with the challenge of enabling the use of confidential or private data for research and policy analysis, while protecting confidentiality and privacy by reducing the risk of disclosure of sensitive information. Traditional solutions to the problem of reducing disclosure risk include releasing de-identified data and modifying data(More)
The skeleton is potential endogenous source of lead during pregnancy and lactation. We have undertaken a longitudinal investigation into the mobilization of lead from the human maternal skeleton to determine whether lead is mobilized from the maternal skeleton during pregnancy and lactation, and if so, when and how much is released. Subjects in the study(More)
As an adjunct to a study of lead mobilization during pregnancy and lactation, we have obtained estimates of the daily lead intake and excretion/intake for 15 newly born infants monitored for at least 6 months postpartum. The longitudinal data presented reflect the far lower levels of environmental contribution to lead in blood in the 1990's than that in the(More)
There has been renewed interest in impacts on physiologic systems in the middle and older age groups, especially from fractures and hypertension. Increased blood lead (BPb) levels in postmenopausal females, which are thought to arise from bone demineralization, may also relate to other health effects including hypertension. Taking advantage of natural(More)
This study deals with fetal growth retardation in heat-exposed sheep, and provides information on mechanisms of acclimation to heat. Radioactive microspheres were used to measure regional capillary blood flows in conscious sheep 80-100 days pregnant, at first in a thermoneutral environment, next after 2.5-6 h exposure to a hot environment of 40 degrees C,(More)
We have compared lead isotopic ratios and lead concentrations in 51 matched blood and spot urine samples from 13 subjects covering the interval from before pregnancy through 180 days postpartum to evaluate whether mobilization of lead from the maternal skeleton is preferentially partitioned into plasma; we have used urine as an isotopic proxy for plasma.(More)
We have compared lead isotopic ratios and lead concentrations in 53 spot urine and 59 24-h urine samples from 13 subjects covering the interval from pre-pregnancy through 180 days postpartum to estimate the amount of lead excreted in urine and renal clearance relative to blood. The total amount of lead excreted in 24-h urine samples ranges from 0.8 to 5.9(More)