John A. Fozard

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Over recent decades, we have gained detailed knowledge of many processes involved in root growth and development. However, with this knowledge come increasing complexity and an increasing need for mechanistic modeling to understand how those individual processes interact. One major challenge is in relating genotypes to phenotypes, requiring us to move(More)
New tools are required to address the challenge of relating plant hormone levels, hormone responses, wall biochemistry and wall mechanical properties to organ-scale growth. Current vertex-based models (applied in other contexts) can be unsuitable for simulating the growth of elongated organs such as roots because of the large aspect ratio of the cells, and(More)
Auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Within the root tip, auxin distribution plays a crucial role specifying developmental zones and coordinating tropic responses. Determining how the organ-scale auxin pattern is regulated at the cellular scale is essential to understanding how these processes are controlled. In this study, we developed(More)
This work examines a 1D individual-based model (IBM) for a system of tightly adherent cells, such as an epithelial monolayer. Each cell occupies a bounded region, defined by the location of its endpoints, has both elastic and viscous mechanical properties and is subject to drag generated by adhesion to the substrate. Differential-algebraic equations(More)
Root elongation and bending require the coordinated expansion of multiple cells of different types. These processes are regulated by the action of hormones that can target distinct cell layers. We use a mathematical model to characterise the influence of the biomechanical properties of individual cell walls on the properties of the whole tissue. Taking a(More)
Bacteria communicate through small diffusible molecules in a process known as quorum sensing. Quorum-sensing inhibitors are compounds which interfere with this, providing a potential treatment for infections associated with bacterial biofilms. We present an individual-based computational model for a developing biofilm. Cells are aggregated into particles(More)
Plants can acclimate by using tropisms to link the direction of growth to environmental conditions. Hydrotropism allows roots to forage for water, a process known to depend on abscisic acid (ABA) but whose molecular and cellular basis remains unclear. Here we show that hydrotropism still occurs in roots after laser ablation removed the meristem and root(More)
Regulation of the activity and localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) membrane proteins, which facilitate efflux of the plant hormone auxin from cells, is important for plants to respond to environmental stimuli and to develop new organs. The protein kinase PINOID (PID) is involved in regulating PIN phosphorylation, and this is thought to affect PIN localization(More)
The optical properties of plant surfaces are strongly determined by the shape of epidermal cells and by the patterning of the cuticle on top of the cells. Combinations of particular cell shapes with particular nanoscale structures can generate a wide range of optical effects. Perhaps most notably, the development of ordered ridges of cuticle on top of flat(More)