Johannes Maria Zaha

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In Service-Oriented Architectures (SOAs), software systems are decomposed into independent units, namely services, that interact with one another through message exchanges. To promote reuse and evolvability, these interactions are explicitly described right from the early phases of the development lifecycle. Up to now, emphasis has been placed on capturing(More)
In a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), a system is viewed as a collection of independent units (services) that interact with one another through message exchanges. Established languages such as the Web Services Description Language and the Business Process Execution Language allow developers to capture the interactions in which an individual service can(More)
— A service-oriented system is a collection of independent services that interact with one another through message exchanges. Languages such as the Web Services Description Language (WSDL) and the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) allow developers to capture the interactions in which an individual service can engage, both from a structural and from(More)
The Web Service Choreography Description Language (WS-CDL) has been put forward as language for capturing sets of web service interactions and their control and data dependencies, seen from a global perspective. However the suitability of WS-CDL for this purpose has not been assessed in a systematic manner. This paper presents such an assessment by adopting(More)
A service choreography is a model of interactions in which a set of services engage to achieve a goal, seen from the perspective of an ideal observer that records all messages exchanged between these services. Choreographies have been put forward as a starting point for building service-oriented systems since they provide a global picture of the system's(More)
In emerging web service development approaches, the description of interactions both from a global and from a local perspective plays an increasingly important role. In earlier work we presented a visual language (namely Let's Dance) for modeling service interactions at different levels of abstraction. In this paper we present a modeling tool for Let's(More)