Johan T den Dunnen

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Consistent gene mutation nomenclature is essential for efficient and accurate reporting, testing, and curation of the growing number of disease mutations and useful polymorphisms being discovered in the human genome. While a codified mutation nomenclature system for simple DNA lesions has now been adopted broadly by the medical genetics community, it is(More)
Locus-Specific DataBases (LSDBs) store information on gene sequence variation associated with human phenotypes and are frequently used as a reference by researchers and clinicians. We developed the Leiden Open-source Variation Database (LOVD) as a platform-independent Web-based LSDB-in-a-Box package. LOVD was designed to be easy to set up and maintain and(More)
The hippocampal expression profiles of wild-type mice and mice transgenic for deltaC-doublecortin-like kinase were compared with Solexa/Illumina deep sequencing technology and five different microarray platforms. With Illumina's digital gene expression assay, we obtained approximately 2.4 million sequence tags per sample, their abundance spanning four(More)
Unambiguous and correct sequence variant descriptions are of utmost importance, not in the least since mistakes and uncertainties may lead to undesired errors in clinical diagnosis. We developed the Mutation Analyzer (Mutalyzer) sequence variation nomenclature checker (www.lovd.nl/mutalyzer; last accessed 13 September 2007) for automated analysis and(More)
Transition of the double-stranded DNA molecule to its two single strands, DNA denaturation or melting, has been used for many years to study DNA structure and composition. Recent technological advances have improved the potential of this technology, especially to detect variants in the DNA sequence. Sensitivity and specificity were increased significantly(More)
CREB-binding protein and p300 function as transcriptional coactivators in the regulation of gene expression through various signal-transduction pathways. Both are potent histone acetyl transferases. A certain level of CREB-binding protein is essential for normal development, since inactivation of one allele causes Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). There is(More)
The completion of the human genome project has initiated, as well as provided the basis for, the collection and study of all sequence variation between individuals. Direct access to up-to-date information on sequence variation is currently provided most efficiently through web-based, gene-centered, locus-specific databases (LSDBs). We have developed the(More)
The severe Duchenne and milder Becker muscular dystrophy are both caused by mutations in the DMD gene. This gene codes for dystrophin, a protein important for maintaining the stability of muscle-fiber membranes. In 1988, Monaco and colleagues postulated an explanation for the phenotypic difference between Duchenne and Becker patients in the reading-frame(More)
Currently available techniques used to recognize point mutations in genetic disease are time consuming and are capable of screening only small pieces of DNA. Moreover, they detect all sequence differences including phenotypically silent changes. Consequently, they are not convenient to analyse mutations in large, multi-exonic genes, where a large fraction(More)
Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 macrosatellite array on chromosome 4 and expression of the D4Z4-encoded DUX4 gene in skeletal muscle. The more common form, autosomal dominant FSHD1, is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 array, whereas the genetic determinants and inheritance of D4Z4 array(More)