Johan SH Vles

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Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a major cause of brain damage and neurodevelopmental impairment in infants. Recent investigations have shown that experimental sublethal fetal asphyxia (FA preconditioning) protects against a subsequent more severe asphyctic insult at birth. The molecular mechanisms of this protection have, however, not been elucidated. Evidence(More)
BACKGROUND Term and near-term infants are at high risk of developing brain injury and life-long disability if they have suffered from severe perinatal asphyxia. We hypothesized that propofol administration to the maternal-fetal unit can diminish cerebral injury in term and near-term infant fetuses in states of progressive severe asphyxia. METHODS(More)
Fetal asphyctic (FA) preconditioning is effective in attenuating brain damage incurred by a subsequent perinatal asphyctic insult. Unraveling mechanisms of this endogenous neuroprotection, activated by FA preconditioning, is an important step towards new clinical strategies for asphyctic neonates. Genomic reprogramming is thought to be, at least in part,(More)
BACKGROUND A computer-based game, named Timo's Adventure, was developed to assess specific cognitive functions (eg, attention, planning, and working memory), time perception, and reward mechanisms in young school-aged children. The game consists of 6 mini-games embedded in a story line and includes fantasy elements to enhance motivation. OBJECTIVE The aim(More)
Genomic reprogramming is thought to be, at least in part, responsible for the protective effect of brain preconditioning. Unraveling mechanisms of this endogenous neuroprotection, activated by preconditioning, is an important step towards new clinical strategies for treating asphyctic neonates. Therefore, we investigated whole-genome transcriptional changes(More)
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