Learn More
Hurricane activity in the North Atlantic Ocean has increased significantly since 1995 (refs 1, 2). This trend has been attributed to both anthropogenically induced climate change and natural variability, but the primary cause remains uncertain. Changes in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes in the past can provide insights into the factors that(More)
Angular distributions for 1n and 2n transfer are reported for the 6He+65Cu system at E_{lab}=22.6 MeV. For the first time, triple coincidences between alpha particles, neutrons, and characteristic gamma rays from the targetlike residues were used to separate the contributions arising from 1n and 2n transfer. The differential cross sections for these(More)
[1] We used Sr/Ca and stable isotope data from well dated and preserved corals from the northeastern Caribbean to determine the seasonal environmental conditions for four continuous years during the Eemian, the last time the Earth was in a prolonged warm phase. We determined that the seasonal range in SST during the Eemian was 25°–30° C. This is $1–2°(More)
100 Sn is a unique case in the nuclear landscape, being doubly magic and the heaviest particle-stable N=Z nucleus. It had been produced and studied already in two FRS experiments [1,2] identifying together eight events. With the improved intensities from the SIS an experiment with good statistics became feasible. We have produced 100 Sn and nuclei in its(More)
The shell structure of atomic nuclei is associated with 'magic numbers' and originates in the nearly independent motion of neutrons and protons in a mean potential generated by all nucleons. During β(+)-decay, a proton transforms into a neutron in a previously not fully occupied orbital, emitting a positron-neutrino pair with either parallel or antiparallel(More)
Shell structure and magic numbers in atomic nuclei were generally explained by pioneering work that introduced a strong spin-orbit interaction to the nuclear shell model potential. However, knowledge of nuclear forces and the mechanisms governing the structure of nuclei, in particular far from stability, is still incomplete. In nuclei with equal neutron and(More)
The next generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, which will give experimental access to many exotic nuclei, are presently being developed. These facilities will make it possible to study very short lived exotic nuclei with extreme values of isospin far from the line of β stability. Such nuclei will be produced with very low cross sections and to(More)
The next generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, which will give experimental access to many exotic nuclei, are presently being developed. At the same time the next generation of high resolution γ-ray spectrometers, based on γ-ray tracking, for studying the structure of these exotic nuclei are being developed. One of the main differences in tracking(More)