Joern Meissner

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C a firm that owns a fixed capacity of a resource that is consumed in the production or delivery of multiple products. The firm strives to maximize its total expected revenues over a finite horizon, either by choosing a dynamic pricing strategy for each product or, if prices are fixed, by selecting a dynamic rule that controls the allocation of capacity to(More)
We develop an approximate dynamic programming approach to network revenue management models with customer choice that approximates the value function of the Markov decision process with a non-linear function which is separable across resource inventory levels. This approximation can exhibit significantly improved accuracy compared to currently available(More)
We consider a family of N items that are produced in, or obtained from, the same production facility. Demands are deterministic for each item and each period within a given horizon of T periods. If in a given period an order is placed, setup costs are incurred. The aggregate order size is constrained by a capacity limit. The objective is to find a(More)
The network choice revenue management problem models customers as choosing from an offer set, and the firm decides the best subset to offer at any given moment to maximize expected revenue. The resulting dynamic program for the firm is intractable and approximated by a deterministic linear program called the CDLP which has an exponential number of columns.(More)
We consider the problem of a firm selling multiple products that consume a single resource over a finite time period. The amount of the resource is exogenously fixed. We analyze the difference between a dynamic pricing policy and a list price capacity control policy. The dynamic pricing policy adjusts prices steadily resolving the underlying problem every(More)
In many implemented network revenue management systems, a bid price control is being used. In this form of control bid, prices are attached to resources, and a product is offered if the revenue derived from it exceeds the sum of the bid prices of its consumed resources. This approach is appealing because once bid prices have been determined, it is fairly(More)