Joel D. Kaufman

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In 2004, the first American Heart Association scientific statement on "Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Disease" concluded that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In the interim, numerous studies have expanded our understanding of this association and further elucidated the physiological(More)
BACKGROUND Fine particulate air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular disease, but previous studies have assessed only mortality and differences in exposure between cities. We examined the association of long-term exposure to particulate matter of less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) with cardiovascular events. METHODS We studied(More)
Current day concentrations of ambient air pollution have been associated with a range of adverse health effects, particularly mortality and morbidity due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. In this review, we summarize the evidence from epidemiological studies on long-term exposure to fine and coarse particles, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and elemental(More)
In this article we present results from a 2-year comprehensive exposure assessment study that examined the particulate matter (PM) exposures and health effects in 108 individuals with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and asthma. The average personal exposures to PM with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5(More)
BACKGROUND Blood pressure (BP) may be implicated in associations observed between ambient particulate matter and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study examined cross-sectional associations between short-term ambient fine particles (particulate matter <or= 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter; PM(2.5)) and BP: systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean(More)
Exposure to airborne particulate matter has been linked to cardiovascular events. Whether this finding reflects an effect of particulate matter exposure on the triggering of events or development of atherosclerosis remains unknown. Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis collected at baseline (2000-2002), the authors investigated(More)
BACKGROUND Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been linked to cardiovascular disease, possibly via accelerated atherosclerosis. We examined associations between the progression of the intima-medial thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery, as an indicator of atherosclerosis, and long-term PM2.5 concentrations in participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study(More)
Evidence suggests that traffic-related pollutants play a role in the observed associations between air pollution and adverse cardiovascular health effects. The contribution of traffic to individual exposures is difficult to quantify in traditional epidemiological studies, however, and researchers have employed various approaches in attempt to isolate its(More)
Ambient fine particulate matter has been associated with cardiovascular and other diseases in epidemiological studies, and diesel exhaust (DE) is a major source of urban fine particulate matter. Air pollution's cardiovascular effects have been attributed to oxidative stress and systemic inflammation, with resulting perturbation of vascular homeostasis.(More)
BACKGROUND Epidemiologic studies have reported increases in the incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and myocardial infarction (MI) associated with increases in short-term and daily levels of fine-particulate matter air pollution, suggesting a role for particulate matter in triggering an MI. METHODS We studied the association between onset time of MI and(More)