Jobi S. George

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Both the pre-supplementary motor area (preSMA) and the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) are important for stopping action outright. These regions are also engaged when preparing to stop. We aimed to elucidate the roles of these regions by harnessing the high spatio-temporal resolution of electrocorticography (ECoG), and by using a task that engages both(More)
Stopping an initiated response is an essential function, investigated in many studies with go/no-go and stop-signal paradigms. These standard tests require rapid action cancellation. This appears to be achieved by a suppression mechanism that has "global" effects on corticomotor excitability (i.e., affecting task-irrelevant muscles). By contrast, stopping(More)
Stopping an initiated response could be implemented by a fronto-basal-ganglia circuit, including the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Intracranial recording studies in humans reveal an increase in beta-band power (approximately 16-20 Hz) within the rIFC and STN when a response is stopped. This suggests that the(More)
Rapidly stopping action engages a network in the brain including the right presupplementary motor area (preSMA), the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the basal ganglia. Yet the functional role of these different regions within the overall network still remains unclear. Here we focused on the role of the right preSMA in behavioral stopping. We hypothesized(More)
It is not yet well understood how dopaminergic therapy improves cognitive and motor function in Parkinson's disease (PD). One possibility is that it reduces the pathological synchronization within and between the cortex and basal ganglia, thus improving neural communication. We tested this hypothesis by recording scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in PD(More)
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is increasingly used in cognitive neuroscience to probe non-motor cortical regions. A key question for such studies is the choice of stimulation intensity. Early studies used a simple metric such as 115% of motor threshold (MT) for non-motor regions; where MT is the stimulation intensity required to elicit a(More)
18 Rapidly stopping action engages a network in the brain including the right pre-supplementary 19 motor area (preSMA), the right inferior frontal gyrus and the basal ganglia. Yet the functional 20 role of these different regions within the overall network still remains unclear. Here we focused 21 on the role of the right preSMA in behavioral stopping. We(More)
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