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Biological motion perception is the compelling ability of the visual system to perceive complex human movements effortlessly and within a fraction of a second. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have revealed that the visual perception of biological motion activates a widespread network of brain areas. The superior temporal sulcus has a(More)
Prosopagnosia is a deficit in recognizing people from their faces. Acquired prosopagnosia results after brain damage, developmental or congenital prosopagnosia (CP) is not caused by brain lesion, but has presumably been present from early childhood onwards. Since other sensory, perceptual, and cognitive abilities are largely spared, CP is considered to be a(More)
Biological motion perception is referred to as the ability to recognize a moving human figure from no more than a few moving point lights. Such point-light stimuli contain limited form information about the shape of the body and local image motion signals from the moving points. The contributions of form and motion to the vivid perception of point-light(More)
Point-light biological motion stimuli provide spatio-temporal information about the structure of the human body in motion. Manipulation of the spatial structure of point-light stimuli reduces the ability of human observers to perceive biological motion. A recent study has reported that interference with the spatial structure of pointlight walkers also(More)
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