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Mirror, mirror on the wall: the predictive value of mirror tests for measuring aggression in fish
The behaviour of animals towards their mirror image (“mirror test”) is routinely used as a proxy to measure aggression levels, especially in fish. The lack of evidence for visual self-recognition inExpand
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Kin recognition: an overview of conceptual issues, mechanisms and evolutionary theory
Kin recognition (KR) is the ability to identify or distinguish kin from nonkin, and it is thought to be an important driving force in the evolution of social and sexual behaviour. Here, we provide anExpand
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Correlated pay-offs are key to cooperation
The general belief that cooperation and altruism in social groups result primarily from kin selection has recently been challenged, not least because results from cooperatively breeding insects andExpand
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Predation risk drives social complexity in cooperative breeders
Significance It is widely accepted that high predation risk may select for group living, but predation is not regarded as a primary driver of social complexity. This view neglects the importantExpand
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Disentangling the effects of group size and density on shoaling decisions of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus)
Many animals live in groups most of their life. One function of this behaviour is an increased predator protection whereas larger groups provide better protection than smaller ones. A causalExpand
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Infection with an acanthocephalan manipulates an amphipod's reaction to a fish predator's odours.
Many parasites with complex life cycles increase the chances of reaching a final host by adapting strategies to manipulate their intermediate host's appearance, condition or behaviour. TheExpand
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The relative importance of prey-borne and predator-borne chemical cues for inducible antipredator responses in tadpoles
Chemical cues that evoke anti-predator developmental changes have received considerable attention, but it is not known to what extent prey use information from the smell of predators and from cuesExpand
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Fish odour triggers conspecific attraction behaviour in an aquatic invertebrate
Group living has evolved as an adaptation to predation in many animal species. In a multitude of vertebrates, the tendency to aggregate varies with the risk of predation, but experimental evidenceExpand
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Group size adjustment to ecological demand in a cooperative breeder
Environmental factors can determine which group size will maximize the fitness of group members. This is particularly important in cooperative breeders, where group members often serve differentExpand
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To eat or not to eat: egg-based assessment of paternity triggers fine-tuned decisions about filial cannibalism
Filial cannibalism occurs in many animal species ranging from insects to mammals, and is especially well described in teleost fishes. Numerous causes may lead to this behaviour, e.g. certainty ofExpand
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