Jissa Vinoda Thulaseedharan

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BACKGROUND India shows some of the highest rates of cervical cancer worldwide, and more than 70% of the population is living in rural villages. Prospective cohort studies to determine the risk factors for cervical cancer are very rare from low and medium resource countries. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of risk factors related to cervical(More)
OBJECTIVE To estimate the long-term risk of cervical cancer among women screened by visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and to evaluate the benefit of additional colposcopy triage in rural south India. METHODS A retrospective analysis was conducted among 31 343 women who had undergone VIA at Dindigul district, India between January 1, 2000, and(More)
BACKGROUND Prospective cohort studies to determine cofactors with oncogenic HPV- infections for cervical cancer are very rare from developing countries and such data are limited to the few screening trials. Large screening trials provide such data as a by product. Some of the cases are prevented by screening and do not surface as invasive cancers at all.(More)
India accounted for a quarter of both the world’s estimated cervical cancer burden of 529,000 cases and 275,000 deaths in 2008 (Ferlay et al., 2010). Cervical cancer is the most frequent primary site of cancer among Indian women with the estimated age standardized cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates of 27 and 15 per 100,000 women, respectively in(More)
BACKGROUND Socioeconomic factors are associated with screening in terms of reducing the risk of cervical cancer. This study aimed to clearly establish the effect of screening on variation in socio-economic factor-specific survival estimates. MATERIALS AND METHODS Survival estimates were calculated using the life table method for 165 women from the routine(More)
Cervical cancer is the leading cancer among Indian women with the estimated age standardized incidence and mortality rates around 2008 of 27 and 15 per 100,000 woman years, respectively (Ferlay et al., 2012). The age standardized cervical cancer incidence rates range from 9-40 per 100,000 woman years in various regions of India (Sankaranarayanan et al.,(More)
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