Jill A. Hollenbach

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Here, we present results for DPA1 and DPB1 four-digit allele-level typing in a large (n = 5,944) sample of unrelated European American stem cell donors previously characterized for other class I and class II loci. Examination of genetic data for both chains of the DP heterodimer in the largest cohort to date, at the amino acid epitope, allele, genotype, and(More)
In the present study, we investigate patterns of variation in the KIR cluster in a large and well-characterized sample of worldwide human populations in the Human Genome Diversity Project—Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (HGDP-CEPH) panel in order to better understand the patterns of diversity in the region. Comparison of KIR data with that from other(More)
We conducted a nationwide study comparing self-identification to genetic ancestry classifications in a large cohort (n = 1752) from the National Marrow Donor Program. We sought to determine how various measures of self-identification intersect with genetic ancestry, with the aim of improving matching algorithms for unrelated bone marrow transplant. Multiple(More)
Interactions between HLA class I molecules and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) control natural killer cell (NK) functions in immunity and reproduction. Encoded by genes on different chromosomes, these polymorphic ligands and receptors correlate highly with disease resistance and susceptibility. Although studied at low-resolution in many(More)
The immune responses of natural killer cells are regulated, in part, by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The 16 closely-related genes in the KIR gene system have been diversified by gene duplication and unequal crossing over, thereby generating haplotypes with variation in gene copy number. Allelic variation also contributes to diversity(More)
HLA class I molecules and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) form a diverse system of ligands and receptors that individualize human immune systems in ways that improve the survival of individuals and populations. Human settlement of Oceania by island-hopping East and Southeast Asian migrants started ~3,500 years ago. Subsequently, New Zealand(More)
Knowledge of an individual's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype is essential for modern medical genetics, and is crucial for hematopoietic stem cell and solid-organ transplantation. However, the high levels of polymorphism known for the HLA genes make it difficult to generate an HLA genotype that unambiguously identifies the alleles that are present at(More)
The immune response HLA class II DRB1 gene provides the major genetic contribution to Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), with a hierarchy of predisposing through intermediate to protective effects. With JIA, and the many other HLA associated diseases, it is difficult to identify the combinations of biologically relevant amino acid (AA) residues directly(More)
The HLA region of chromosome 6 contains the most polymorphic genes in humans. Spanning ~5 Mbp the densely packed region encompasses approximately 175 expressed genes including the highly polymorphic HLA class I and II loci. Most of the other genes and functional elements are also polymorphic, and many of them are directly implicated in immune function or(More)
The physiological functions of natural killer (NK) cells in human immunity and reproduction depend upon diverse interactions between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their HLA class I ligands: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C. The genomic regions containing the KIR and HLA class I genes are unlinked, structurally complex, and highly polymorphic.(More)