Jerry C. P. Yin

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We report the role of dCREB2, the Drosophila homolog of CREB/CREM, in circadian rhythms. dCREB2 activity cycles with a 24 hr rhythm in flies, both in a light:dark cycle and in constant darkness. A mutation in dCREB2 shortens circadian locomotor rhythm in flies and dampens the oscillation of period, a known clock gene. Cycling dCREB2 activity is abolished in(More)
How long-term memories are stored is a fundamental question in neuroscience. The first molecular mechanism for long-term memory storage in the brain was recently identified as the persistent action of protein kinase Mzeta (PKMzeta), an autonomously active atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isoform critical for the maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP).(More)
In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, rest shares features with mammalian sleep, including prolonged immobility, decreased sensory responsiveness and a homeostatic rebound after deprivation. To understand the molecular regulation of sleep-like rest, we investigated the involvement of a candidate gene, cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB). The(More)
Drosophila melanogaster flies concentrate behavioral activity around dawn and dusk. This organization of daily activity is controlled by central circadian clock neurons, including the lateral-ventral pacemaker neurons (LN(v)s) that secrete the neuropeptide PDF (pigment dispersing factor). Previous studies have demonstrated the requirement for PDF signaling(More)
Synaptic stimulation activates signal transduction pathways, producing persistently active protein kinases. PKMzeta is a truncated, persistently active isoform of atypical protein kinase C-zeta (aPKCzeta), which lacks the N-terminal pseudosubstrate regulatory domain. Using a Pavlovian olfactory learning task in Drosophila, we found that induction of the(More)
There has been considerable progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms that contribute to memory formation and the generation of circadian rhythms. However, it is not well understood how these two processes interact to generate long-term memory. Recent studies in both vertebrate and invertebrate models have shown time-of-day effects on neurophysiology(More)
The Baz/Par-3-Par-6-aPKC complex is an evolutionarily conserved cassette critical for the development of polarity in epithelial cells, neuroblasts, and oocytes. aPKC is also implicated in long-term synaptic plasticity in mammals and the persistence of memory in flies, suggesting a synaptic function for this cassette. Here we show that at Drosophila(More)
The Drosophila homolog of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), dCREB2, exists with serine 231, equivalent to mammalian serine 133, in a predominantly phosphorylated state. Thus, unlike the mammalian protein, the primary regulation of dCREB2 may occur at a different step from serine 231 phosphorylation. Although bacterially expressed dCREB2 bound(More)
How long-term memories are stored is a fundamental question in neuroscience. The first molecular mechanism for long-term memory storage in the brain was recently identified as the persistent action of protein kinase Mzeta (PKMf), an autonomously active atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isoform critical for the maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). PKMf(More)
We show that atypical PKCiota, which plays a critical role in the establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity, is genomically amplified and overexpressed in serous epithelial ovarian cancers. Furthermore, PKCiota protein is markedly increased or mislocalized in all serous ovarian cancers. An increased PKCiota DNA copy number is associated with(More)