Jerome F. Grant

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The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, is an invasive species reducing the populations of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis L. Carrière, throughout the eastern United States. Systemic imidacloprid and horticultural oil are the primary chemicals used to control infestations of this invasive pest; however, the impact of these two chemicals on(More)
The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is an exotic insect species dramatically reducing populations of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrieré, throughout the eastern United States. Systemic imidacloprid is one of the primary chemicals used to successfully control infestations of the hemlock woolly adelgid. The(More)
Widespread mortality of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, resulting from infestation by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), has occurred throughout the native range of eastern hemlock within the eastern United States. Imidacloprid, a systemic insecticide, is one of the primary chemical compounds used to(More)
An assessment of the insect guild structure associated with immature and mature eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, at high and low elevations was made before the invasion by the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Annand), and elongate hemlock scale, Fiorinia externa Ferris. Guild dynamics were determined among 243 insect species(More)
Black walnut, a valuable economic and environmentally important species, is threatened by thousand cankers disease. Systemic imidacloprid and dinotefuran applications were made to mature black walnut trees to evaluate their translocation and concentration levels in various tissue types including leaf, twig, trunk core, nutmeat, and walnut husk. The(More)
Widespread decline and mortality of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, have been caused by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Annand) (HWA) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). The current study is a retrospective analysis conducted in collaboration with Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) to determine longevity of imidacloprid and its(More)
American beech gaps in the southern Appalachian mountains are currently threatened by an insect-mediated disease complex known as beech bark disease. Cryptococcus fagisuga Lindinger, or beech scale, a major component of beech bark disease, wounds trees through feeding on vascular tissue through the outer cambium. This feeding method leaves numerous wounds(More)
Nontarget feeding of Rhinocyllus conicus Fröelich and Trichosirocalus horridus (Panzer) on native North American thistles in the genus Cirsium has been documented. Some species of these native thistles have shown greater infestation levels of R. conicus in populations that are in close proximity to the target plant species, Carduus nutans L. In 2005 a study(More)
To reduce populations of hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), >500,000 Sasajiscymnus tsugae (Sasaji and McClure) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) have been released in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park since 2002. To determine factors affecting establishment and recovery of these predatory beetles, 65 single release sites(More)
Rhinocyllus conicus Fröelich was introduced from Europe into North America as a biological control agent of the exotic weed Carduus nutans L. Concern exists over the feeding of this weevil on at least 25 species of native Cirsium thistles. Beginning in 2008, cage studies isolating adults of R. conicus on buds and flower heads of all eight thistle species(More)